Nice Grinding Surface pictures

Verify out these grinding surface photos:

Charles Perkins Centre

Image by Sidneiensis
Founded in 1850, the University of Sydney is Australia’s 1st university and is regarded as a single of its most prestigious, ranked as the 27th most trustworthy university in the world. In 2013, it was ranked 38th and in the prime .3% in the QS Globe University Rankings. 5 Nobel or Crafoord laureates have been affiliated with the university as graduates and faculty. The University is colloquially identified as one of Australia’s &quotSandstones&quot, a status similar to that of the &quotIvy League&quot in the United States and the &quotRussell Group&quot in the United Kingdom.

The university’s Coat of Arms, granted by the College of Arms are an amalgamation of the arms of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and their essential figures, heraldry and other references to the two ancient universities are sprawled throughout the university in its architecture and character. Its motto, &quotSidere mens eadem mutato&quot translated actually gives &quotThough the stars adjust, the thoughts is the very same&quot, but has been a lot more liberally translated to give, &quotSydney University is actually just Oxford or Cambridge laterally displaced around 12,000 miles&quot.

The 2013 QS Planet University Rankings placed Sydney in the leading 20 in the planet in 11 subjects more than a third of the 30 measured. The University of Sydney was ranked 8th in the planet for Education, 9th in Accounting and Finance and 10th in Law. Moreover, Sydney was placed 12th in English Language and Literature, History and Archaeology, Linguistics and Civil Engineering and Structural Engineering, the highest in Australia of these subjects. Psychology at Sydney was ranked 14th, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, and Communication and Media were ranked 16th, and the Sydney Health-related School was ranked 17th.

Its primary campus has been ranked in the prime ten of the world’s most beautiful universities by the British Everyday Telegraph, The Huffington Post and Disney Pixar, among other individuals such as Oxford and Cambridge and is spread across the inner-city suburbs of Camperdown and Darlington.

The analysis and education hub of the Charles Perkins Centre is a 49,500 square metre state-of-the-art building made to help collaboration and new ways of considering. Opened for Semester 1 of 2014, the new developing comprises a structure of six floors, plus 3 basement levels, and an location of approximately 49,500 square metres – almost twice the surface location of the Sydney Cricket Ground.

Located on the north-west boundary of the University’s Camperdown Campus, bordering St John’s College and subsequent to the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPA) – Sydney’s largest hospital and the teaching hospital of the Sydney Medical School. The hub will play a important function in fostering collaboration and multidisciplinary analysis, generating a analysis and education precinct with hyperlinks to nearby affiliated medical analysis institutes and the hospital.

This creating along with the original sandstone Anderson Stuart health-related school is my new property.

Beauty Can Be Seen in the Pink of an Eye!

Image by antonychammond
These tulips have been opening up to the sun in our garden last spring.

The tulip is a perennial, bulbous plant with showy flowers in the genus Tulipa, of which around 75 wild species are presently accepted and which belongs to the family members Liliaceae.

The genus’s native range extends west to the Iberian Peninsula, by way of North Africa to Greece, the Balkans, Turkey, all through the Levant (Syria, Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan) and Iran, North to Ukraine, southern Siberia and Mongolia, and east to the Northwest of China. The tulip’s centre of diversity is in the Pamir, Hindu Kush, and Tien Shan mountains. It is a common element of steppe and winter-rain Mediterranean vegetation. A quantity of species and several hybrid cultivars are grown in gardens, as potted plants, or as reduce flowers.

Tulips are spring-blooming perennials that develop from bulbs. Based on the species, tulip plants can be in between four inches (ten cm) and 28 inches (71 cm) high. The tulip’s large flowers usually bloom on scapes with leaves in a rosette at ground level and a single flowering stalk arising from amongst the leaves.Tulip stems have few leaves. Larger species tend to have several leaves. Plants normally have two to six leaves, some species up to 12. The tulip’s leaf is strap-shaped, with a waxy coating, and the leaves are alternately arranged on the stem these fleshy blades are often bluish green in colour. Most tulips make only 1 flower per stem, but a couple of species bear a number of flowers on their scapes (e.g. Tulipa turkestanica). The typically cup or star-shaped tulip flower has 3 petals and 3 sepals, which are often termed tepals due to the fact they are almost identical. These six tepals are frequently marked on the interior surface close to the bases with darker colorings. Tulip flowers come in a wide selection of colors, except pure blue (a number of tulips with &quotblue&quot in the name have a faint violet hue).

The flowers have six distinct, basifixed stamens with filaments shorter than the tepals. Each and every stigma has 3 distinct lobes, and the ovaries are superior, with 3 chambers. The tulip’s seed is a capsule with a leathery covering and an ellipsoid to globe shape. Each capsule includes quite a few flat, disc-shaped seeds in two rows per chamber. These light to dark brown seeds have really thin seed coats and endosperm that does not normally fill the entire seed.

Etymology

The word tulip, first described in western Europe in or around 1554 and seemingly derived from the &quotTurkish Letters&quot of diplomat Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, initial appeared in English as tulipa or tulipant, entering the language by way of French: tulipe and its obsolete type tulipan or by way of Contemporary Latin tulīpa, from Ottoman Turkish tülbend (&quotmuslin&quot or &quotgauze&quot), and could be in the end derived from the Persian: دلبند‎ delband (&quotTurban&quot), this name becoming applied simply because of a perceived resemblance of the shape of a tulip flower to that of a turban. This might have been due to a translation error in early instances, when it was trendy in the Ottoman Empire to wear tulips on turbans. The translator possibly confused the flower for the turban.

Tulips are referred to as laleh (from Persian لاله, lâleh) in Persian, Turkish, Arabic, and Bulgarian. In Arabic letters, &quotlaleh&quot is written with the exact same letters as Allah, which is why the flower became a holy symbol. It was also related with the Home of Osman, resulting in tulips being extensively utilized in decorative motifs on tiles, mosques, fabrics, crockery, and so forth. in the Ottoman Empire

Cultivation

Tulip cultivars have typically a number of species in their direct background, but most have been derived from Tulipa suaveolens, usually erroneously listed as Tulipa schrenkii. Tulipa gesneriana is in itself an early hybrid of complicated origin and is most likely not the exact same taxon as was described by Conrad Gesner in the 16th century.

Tulips are indigenous to mountainous locations with temperate climates and require a period of cool dormancy, identified as vernalization. They thrive in climates with extended, cool springs and dry summers. Tulip bulbs imported to warm-winter regions of are often planted in autumn to be treated as annuals.

Tulip bulbs are usually planted around late summer season and fall, in properly-drained soils, typically from 4 to 8 inches (ten to 20 cm) deep, based on the kind. Species tulips are typically planted deeper.

Propagation

Tulips can be propagated by means of bulb offsets, seeds or micropropagation. Offsets and tissue culture methods are indicates of asexual propagation for producing genetic clones of the parent plant, which maintains cultivar genetic integrity. Seeds are most typically employed to propagate species and subspecies or to generate new hybrids. Many tulip species can cross-pollinate with every single other, and when wild tulip populations overlap geographically with other tulip species or subspecies, they typically hybridize and create mixed populations. Most industrial tulip cultivars are complex hybrids, and usually sterile.

Offsets need a year or more of growth ahead of plants are big adequate to flower. Tulips grown from seeds frequently need 5 to eight years just before plants are of flowering size. Industrial growers usually harvest the tulip bulbs in late summer time and grade them into sizes bulbs huge sufficient to flower are sorted and sold, whilst smaller bulbs are sorted into sizes and replanted for sale in the future. The Netherlands are the world’s major producer of commercial tulip plants, generating as many as three billion bulbs annually, the majority for export.

For additional information please go to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulip

Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars

Image by NASA on The Commons
Description: This image, acquired by the Mars International Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) in Might 2000 shows quite a few examples of martian gullies that all start–or head–in a specific layer roughly a hundred meters beneath the surface of Mars. These attributes are situated on the south-facing wall of a trough in the Gorgonum Chaos area, an region identified to have a lot of examples of gullies proposed to have formed by seepage and runoff of liquid water in recent martian occasions. The layer from which the gullies emanate has recessed backward to type an overhang beneath a harder layer of rock. The bigger gullies have formed an alcove–an area above the overhang from which debris has collapsed to leave a dark-toned scar. Under the layer of seepage is located a dark, narrow channel that runs down the slope to an apron of debris. The little, bright, parallel characteristics at the base of the cliff at the center-correct of the picture is a series of large windblown ripples. Though the dark tone of the alcoves and channels in this image is not probably to be the result of wet ground (the contrast in this image has been enhanced), it does suggest that water has seeped out of the ground and moved down the slope very not too long ago. Sharp contrasts in between dark and light places are hard to preserve on Mars for really long periods of time due to the fact dust tends to coat surfaces and minimize brightness differences. To preserve dust from settling on a surface, it has to have undergone some procedure of erosion (wind, landslides, water runoff) comparatively not too long ago. There is no way to know how current this activity was, but educated guesses center among a couple of to tens of years, and it is totally possible that the location shown in this image has water seeping out of the ground right now. Centered close to 37.9S, 170.2W, sunlight illuminates the MOC image from the upper left, north is toward the upper right.

Image # : PIA01033
Date: June 22, 2000

Good Engine Turning photos

Some cool engine turning pictures:

Lake Street #5 Near Engine Property at Crawford

Image by cta web
Before electrification, the very first two ‘L’ roads ran trains with wooden cars pulled by steam locomotives like this one right here. These locomotives burned coal to heat water and generate pressurized steam like any steam engine would, but had been considerably smaller sized than what you may well have noticed in old film footage of intercity railways. ‘L’ trains had been light and the locomotives needed to be, too, so they could choose up speed and stop quickly, considering the close spacing of fast transit stations.

The locomotive style is referred to as a &quotForney,&quot soon after steam locomotive designer Matthias Forney, which could operate in either path, assisting to make it simpler to attach a locomotive to the back side of a train at the end of a line, and adjust path and run a reverse trip without obtaining to turn a locomotive about.

The Lake Street ‘L’ really named its locomotives in addition to numbering them. Observed right here is #five, named &quotLizzie A.&quot (regrettably, we’re not certain who Lizzie was, but she possibly was a person who had a relation to the ‘L’ firm or an individual else who did). The Lake Street ‘L’ ran steam locomotives till 1896, converting to electric energy a little ahead of its slightly older peer serving the South Side, a separate company at the time.

The station in the background is Crawford, later renamed Pulaski.

Image from web page 247 of “Locomotive engineering : a sensible journal of railway motive energy and rolling stock” (1892)

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: locomotiveengine10hill
Title: Locomotive engineering : a sensible journal of railway motive power and rolling stock
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Hill, John A. (John Alexander), 1858-1916 Sinclair, Angus, 1841-1919
Subjects: Railroads Locomotives
Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair, J.A. Hill [and so forth.]
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Photos From Book

Click right here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable on-line version of this book.

Text Appearing Prior to Image:
ighboring road, andwhen, for the convenience of passengers,the train in query was started, it wasrun precisely on the same time as the trainon the other road, and it may well be effectively to the smoke. This was also a lot for thefeelings of not only the passengers, butengineer and conductor, and the former,in his eagerness to make much better time,occasionally did not cease just at the station,even with the engine reversed, and thelatter, with a lot of apologies, would assistthe passengers to alight at the road-side.The brakes on the vehicles were in goodorder and completely equal in energy to ninetyper cent, of weight of car the tenderbrake was equally great but the driverbrake was of the pull-up sort, with theusual gland leakage. To preserve the pistonpacking tight, the engineer was accus-tomed, when oiling, to carry an oil canin 1 hand and a water can in the other.This brake was produced to do very good workby turning the cylinders upside down,altering the pistons on the rods, puttingon a lengthy crosshead, and creating it push

Text Appearing Following Image:
CANADIAN PACIFIC ENGINE, WITH FIKST FORWARD TUUCK BRAKE APPLIED. mention that these roads ran side by sidefor the entire distance, and the stationson every single were directly opposite to eachother. The train consisted of two 50,000-poundcars and a four-wheel coupled Manchesterengine, with 16-inch cylinder and 62-inchwheels. The tank was sloped to the back,and a pilot put on the back of the tender,as thete was no indicates of turning engineat a single finish of the run. A couple of passengers patronized the newtrain but when it was discovered that the littleengine could not get there on time, andmake all the stops, which had been thirteen ina distance of 23 miles, they made verybroad hints of going back to the otherline. The engine on the other road was a re-markably excellent one, and was built tor thatparticular service, with the water tank onthe boiler, and it utilized to get out of thestation with such surprising speed that thelittle Manchester could have a excellent viewof the rear of that train when it did not get up rather

Note About Pictures
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned web page pictures that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original operate.

11_all sugar imports thereafter

Some cool surface grinding manufacturer images:

11_all sugar imports thereafter

Image by Jim Surkamp
Income Wizard R. D. Shepherd and His Fabled Building – McMurran Hall, Shepherdstown, WV by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/?p=13106 7907 words.

Made achievable with the generous, community-minded help of American Public University, offering a top quality, on the internet education. The interpretations of posts in civilwarscholars.com do not in any way reflect the modern day-day policies of the University. More at apus.edu

Patriarch R. D. Shepherd’s Homecoming 1859

1_About how a young boy from Shepherdstown
About how a young boy from Shepherdstown constructed a enormous fortune by way of work, smarts and an act of his own heroism for one more then, turns about and provides much of it back as McMurran Hall, an Almshouse in New Orleans and other gifts.

two_R. D. Shepherd had a strict, flinty way
R. D. Shepherd had a strict, flinty way, but on paper and in the world at massive did his massive generosities stand tall, pervade the landscape and enrich the hearts of humanity.

3_Seventy-5-year-old Rezin
Seventy-5-year-old Rezin Davis Shepherd, described by the New Orleans Picayune as having “the largest and most productive estate which has ever been held by a single particular person in this city and State” – began the construction Thursday, October 6th, 1859 of a present to his home town, this time proper on lot no. 1 in Shepherdstown, the very lot exactly where he was born in August 1, 1784.

4_Who knew that in ten fleeting day
Who knew that in ten fleeting days – October 16th – history would be blown off its hinges by the John Brown raiders’ attack fifteen miles away at Harpers Ferry, the match that lit the simmering fever of division among

five_North and South more than slavery
North and South over slavery and claimed rights to secede from the Union. The tempest raged back and forth over the county and the town for 1300 hundred days of pitiless strife and war before settling back into getting a barren, alien landscape.

6_RD’s creating
RD’s (“RD” henceforth for “Rezin Davis Shepherd”) building – gorgeous as were all his buildings remains a Greek Revival style, with a two-story-portico and Corinthian flourishes. But in the 1860s, it would bear witness to all that was rent asunder and itself narrowly avoid destruction, unlike a much less lucky altruistic juggernaut project of Shepherd’s in New Orleans – the palatial Almshouse. But this, RD’s Town Hall, first named, would sooner or later reside a “long, happy life” very first as the County Court, then into its present-day majesty as the signature constructing of Shepherd University.

Increasing Up – RD Learns the Trade:

7_When he was just nine years old
8_placed him in the shop and counting house
When he was just nine years old, RD’s father, Abraham, placed him in the store and counting home in Baltimore of William Taylor,

9_an ambitious importer and ship-owner
an ambitious importer and ship-owner. RD’s incredible gifts surfaced when he – just eighteen – was sent to New Orleans to assure a great return on a large shipment of British goods his firm had bought for New Orleans’ customers. Then his 1st large “killing” was with one more fresh-faced, difficult-driving Taylor colleague, James McDonough. Wrote the Picayune: In October, 1803, it was nicely recognized throughout the nation that Louisiana had been bought by the United States. Mr. Taylor was the only merchant who seemed to comprehend the profit from one particular consequence of the this great political occasion.

ten_in becoming a state
11_all sugar imports thereafter
12_cornered 1800 of those hogsheads
The firm realized that in becoming a state, a duty of two.5 cents would be added to the value of all sugar imports thereafter. So Shepherd and McDonough – when all the sugar created in the state was between 2100-2200 hogsheads – cornered 1800 of these hogsheads, giving young RD “a handsome capital for a young man to start off in mercantile life.” He soon designed a new firm shared with Taylor, then in time through age and retirement became RD’s alone.

13_Coming into his personal
Coming into his personal, he married Lucy Taylor Gorham of Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1808, who was “a niece and adopted daughter” of Taylor. On August 22nd, 1809, their only kid, Ellen Shepherd, was born in Louisiana. (Lucy would die in 1814).

14_the penchant of RD
It was at this juncture the penchant of RD for standard, publicity-averse benefactions took root, in the moment of his willed defiance against a direct military order to work, alternatively, to save 1 specific wounded man, left for dead in war, a man who himself would live on to grow to be the epitome of the proverbial Good Man, albeit

15_His name was Judah Touro
extraordinarily wealthy. His name was Judah Touro, a prime-hatted, but humble Jewish businessman who believed in respect for all religions and day-to-day applications of the code of excellent functions. He was beloved throughout his circles and area as “the Israelite with out guile.”

Wrote Author Colyar:

16_Wrote Author Colyar
17_carrying ammunition on the battle field
While carrying ammunition on the battle field Jan. 1, 1815 Mr. Touro was struck by a 12-pound shot which tore

18_12-pound shot
19_a large mass of flesh from the thigh
a large mass of flesh from the thigh and prostrated him among the dead and dying. Mr. Rezin Shepherd, was carrying a unique order from Commodore Patterson across the river to the main army. On reaching the bank he met a pal, who told him his buddy Touro was dead. Inquiring where he was, Shepherd was informed that he had been taken to

20_Jackson’s headquarters
an old constructing in the rear of Jackson’s headquarters. Forgetting his orders, Mr. Shepherd went immediately to the spot and discovered he was not dead, but, as the surgeon stated, in a dying situation. Disregarding what the surgeon mentioned, Shepherd got a cart, put him in it, administered stimulants, and took Touro to his personal residence. He then procured nurses, and by the closest consideration, Mr. Touro’s life was saved. Mr. Shepherd returned late in the day,

21_Commodore Patterson in a bad humor
having performed his mission, to find Commodore Patterson in a poor humor, and, speaking severely to him, the latter mentioned: “Commodore, you can hang or shoot me, and it will be all proper, but my greatest pal needed my assistance, and practically nothing on earth could have induced me to neglect him.”

RD’s organizations continued to develop exponentially and his brother, James Hervey Shepherd, was summoned from Shepherdstown to assist.

22_Shepherd, was summoned from Shepherdstown to assist.
1817-1837 – RD travels to Europe, settles in Boston doting on his daughter’s education.

23_1822 – RD maintained his companies
24_at 5 Pearl Street and nearby 28 Indian Wharf property.
1822 – RD maintained his businesses and shipping concerns at 5 Pearl Street and nearby 28 Indian Wharf residence.

25_her portrait painted by Thomas Sully
26_Gilbert Stuart is commissioned to paint his own portrait
He has her portrait painted by Thomas Sully in 1831, a couple of years following Gilbert Stuart is commissioned to paint his personal portrait. (Stuart died in 1828).

1829, April 20 – Ellen Shepherd marries Gorham Brooks of Medford, Massachusetts.

1834 – RD commissions Samuel Fuller to create the 480-ton merchant ship in Medford, named following his daughter, the “Ellen Brooks.”

27_James Hervey Shepherd dies
1837 – James Hervey Shepherd dies. RD returns to run organizations in New Orleans.

1837, July 23 – Ellen (Shepherd) Brooks and her husband, generally in Boston or Medford, temporarily reside in Baltimore.

28_nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr.
1837-1865 – RD’s nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr., who was brought up in his uncle’s counting area, steadily assumes the role as RD’s agent in New Orleans.

29_painting of the ship the “Ellen Brooks” is completed
1839 – RD’s commissioned painting of the ship the “Ellen Brooks” is completed, attributed to Samuel Walters (British, 1811-1882), called “Ellen Brooks, Off Holyhead, Homeward Bound.”

1841 – RD buys 468 acres of land and begins developing Wild Goose Farm, but not however living there complete-time he also pays for most of the remodeling of the original Trinity Episcopal Church in Shepherdstown.

1842, June – RD signs a petition to Congress along with many other planters and sugar companies in the state of Louisiana that asks for an improve in the duties on imported sugar.

1849 – RD locations responsibilities on his eighteen-year-old nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr., who would grow to be his agent in New Orleans via the Civil War, enabling RD to return much more permanently to his Wild Goose Farm.

30_Wild Goose Farm
31_the 1850 Census shows
32_1850 and 1860 Census slave schedules
1850 – In Shepherdstown &amp Wild Goose Farm the 1850 Census shows 66-year-old RD with a period worth of ,000, living only with workmen: 26-year-old German-born master stonemason Conrad Smith and an overseer. Although a single account states Touro stipulated that RD cost-free his enslaved persons, RD is shown to having owned many persons, enumerated in each the 1850 and 1860 Census slave schedules.

1854, January 6th – Touro’s Will makes Rezin Davis Shepherd residuary legatee of the estate and executor 5,000 is willed to particular recipients. A sum iof ,000 is set aside for a palatial almshouse, with the added stipulation to RD that more sums, if required, need to be utilized to complete this priority project.

Judah Touro produced out his will January six, 1854 a few days just before his death that stated:

33_my dear, old, and devoted friend, Rezin Davis Shepherd
34_I hereby appoint and institute him
As regards my other designated executor, say my dear, old, and devoted buddy, Rezin Davis Shepherd, to whom, below Divine Providence, I am tremendously indebted for the preservation of my life when I was wounded on the 1st of January, 1815, I hereby appoint and institute him, the mentioned Rezin Davis Shepherd, soon after payment of my specific legacies, and the debts of my succession, the universal legatee of the rest and residue of my estates, movable and immovable.

35_funded remodeling of the Trinity
RD continued his projects each in New Orleans and Shepherdstown. He had already funded remodeling of the Trinity

36_planned a clock and bell to its original church
Episcopal Church. He planned a clock and bell to its original church then right after some legal squabbling – the clock – to everyone’s assent – was reassigned to be inserted in to the new government developing.

The Shepherd Household is Scattered By War:

37_The war hit the family challenging
The war hit the family members hard. Most of the young guys enlisted in Virginia units. RD had to recalibrate his enterprise strategies. Wrote the Richmond Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861:
The New Orleans Delta states that R. D. Shepherd, Esq., who is now at an sophisticated time of life, living on his lovely farm close to Shepherdstown, Virginia, has directed his agent in New Orleans to pay more than to the treasurer of the Confederate States a massive sum of income, which includes, it is said, his complete annual earnings from rents in that city — the largest income enjoyed by any home holder — to be applied to the defence of the rights and the help of the independence of the South.

38_spring of 1862 when Federal General Banks
In the spring of 1862 when Federal General Banks with his army entered into Jefferson County, RD took refuge in Boston with his daughter.

39_As the war progressed
As the war progressed, its maw of destruction came closer to Shepherdstown’s nearly full developing. 130,000 troops moved in the area in September, 1862 for the bloody Maryland Campaign, just across the Potomac river. Wounded from the nearby battles poured into Shepherdstown, placing the unfinished Town Hall into service as an outdoor hospital.

Wrote Mary Bedinger Mitchell:

40_The unfinished Town Hall had stood in naked ugliness
The unfinished Town Hall had stood in naked ugliness for numerous a lengthy day. Somebody threw a few rough boards across the beams, placed piles of straw over them, laid down single planks to walk upon, and lo, it was a hospital at once.

There have been six churches and they were all complete, the barn-like spot identified as the Drill Room, all the private houses soon after their capacity, the shops and empty buildings, the school-homes – each and every inch of space and yet the cry was for more room.

We went about our work with pale faces and trembling hands, however attempting to appear composed for the sake of our individuals, who had been a lot excited. We could hear the incessant explosions of artillery, the shrieking whistles of the shells, and the sharper, deadlier more thrilling roll of musketry while every now and then the echo of some charging cheer would come, borne by the wind, and as the human voice would pierce that demoniacal clangor we would catch out breath and listen, and try not to sob, and turn back to the forlorn hospitals, to the suffering at our feet and prior to our eyes although imagination fainted at the believed of these other scenes hidden from us beyond the Potomac.

Had Federal Common George McClellan crossed the Potomac and pursued Common Lee’s scattered and mauled army, as historians have a lot criticized him considering that for not undertaking, Shepherdstown would have most likely suffered greater harm, but, as it was, shells landed in the yards of the Lees and Morgans and one particular or two even hit Shepherd’s new Town Hall, but were of small consequence.

Property Losses in New Orleans:

41_RD’s fine residence at 18 Bourbon Street
42_18 Bourbon Street in New Orleans
A lot more invasive, improvised use was becoming made of RD’s fine residence at 18 Bourbon Street in New Orleans, causing his nephew to formally appeal to the Federal powers-that-be in early 1864. He wrote:

43_From Brig. Common James Bowen
January 29, 1864
From Brig. Common James Bowen
Provost Marshal General
Division of the Gulf.

Sir:
The undersigned acting as the duly authorized agent and attorney in reality of Rezin Davis Shepherd, formerly the State of Virginia, but for far more than eight months past residing with his daughter Mrs. Gorham Brooks in the city of Boston and State of Massachusetts, respectfully represents: That the mentioned Shepherd is a loyal citizen of the United States and the accurate and lawful owner of the Brick Dwelling No. 18 Bourbon Street between Canal and Custom Property Streets in the City of New Orleans and also of all the furnishings and contents thereof: that in the month of June, 1862 Col. Stafford with out show of authority, placed in possession of said property and contents, a man by the name of Horton or Houghton, who has ever because occupied and now occupied and utilizes the exact same as a Boarding Residence, and who by no means has paid any rent or compensation there and continually refused to do so.

Under the situations, the undersigned respectfully appeals to you, General, for relief, and asks that the matter be referred to Capt. Edward Page and Thomas Tileston, or other of them for investigation and that the aforesaid premises and contents be restored to the possession of the owner without having delay Henry Shepherd Jr.

Like The Town Hall, the massive, magnificent Almshouse in New Orleans remained unfinished, to be hit by a worse fate. Shepherd was charged by Touro’s will to initial place ,00 toward its building, then be ready to put far more cash into its building- which includes even some of Shepherd’s personal funds – as recipient of Touro’s residue.

44_occupied by detachments of the 2nd Maine Cavalry
45_The fire started
46_Baked beans fired the developing
On September 1, 1865, at a time the Almshouse in New Orleans – still with an unfinished, floorless prime floor – was occupied by detachments of the 2nd Maine Cavalry and Firm K, First Louisiana Cavalry. A baking oven was in heavy use at 1 finish of the creating so that heat would be carried by way of a fissure in a ventilation program close by. The fire began in the rafters above the third floor. It was night-time with a higher wind and no flooring however laid for the third floor in that wing. Coals dripping from the fire then ignited tar on the reduced walls. “Baked beans fired the building” mentioned 1 from the 2nd Maine Cavalry. The developing was uninsured. Just a couple of months later R. D. Shepherd died of typhoid fever, November ten, 1865, no longer the executor of the estate, leaving no philanthropist to support make up the loss.

Wrote the editors of the Occasions-Picayune in a lengthy obituary:
In his native village he erected a splendid creating, designed for a town hall, also a massive academy, with gorgeous grounds and a walk. He also deposited with the Mayor annually a large sum to acquire fuel and provisions for the poor. He also erected the biggest and most costly church in Jefferson County. Numerous other acts of public and private benevolence had been performed by him in his quiet, furtive manner.

With war ended and when he was still healthy, RD had urged that his Town Hall turn into the County Court given that the Charlestown courthouse was a battle-scarred ruin, especially from a shelling it took in the fall of 1863.

A Visitor Contemplates Charlestown’s Ruined Courthouse in mid-1865:

47_the court-house, where that mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin
48_4 massive white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof
A short walk up into the centre of the town took us to the scene of John Brown’s trial. It was a consolation to see that the jail had been laid in ashes, and that the court-property, exactly where that mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin abandoned to rats and toads. 4 massive white brick pillars, nonetheless standing, supported a riddled roof, by means of which God’s blue sky and gracious sunshine smiled. The primary portion of the constructing had been literally torn to pieces. In the floor-less hall of justice rank weeds had been developing.

49_Names of Union soldiers have been scrawled along the walls
Names of Union soldiers had been scrawled along the walls. No torch had been applied to the wood-perform, but the operate of destruction had been performed by the hands of hilarious soldier-boys ripping up floors and pulling down laths and joists to the tune of “John Brown,” the swelling melody of the song, and the accompaniment of crashing partitions, reminding the citizens, who believed to have destroyed the old hero, that his soul was marching on. It was also a consolation to know that the court-property and jail would most likely in no way be rebuilt, the county-seat obtaining been removed from Charlestown to Shepherdstown — “forever,” say the resolute loyal citizens of Jefferson County, who rose to vote it back once more.

50_either buried in Elmwood Cemetery or the Shepherd Burial Ground
The Shepherd boys who enlisted in Virginia organizations every single – more than time – came home and had been either buried in Elmwood Cemetery or the Shepherd Burial Ground – or lived.

51_Clarence Edward Shepherd
Clarence Edward Shepherd became a teacher in Maryland.

Whilst RD’s nephew and agent, Henry Shepherd Jr. was in New Orleans in the course of the war, minding the loved ones interests, 3 of his brothers had been at war. The eldest Rezin Davis, his older brother who had a young family

52_eldest Rezin Davis, his older brother who had a young loved ones
considering that 1858, died of illness November two, 1862 at his “river cottage” soon after imprisonment in the Old Capitol Prison for getting an associate of Confederate spy, Redmond Burke. He left his widow, Elizabeth Boteler Stockton Shepherd, two kids (Fannie and Alexandria) and a third (David) on the way. Possibly very first buried on his farm, Rezin Shepherd (a nephew of the patriarch) was reburied after peace came in the new Elmwood Cemetery. His internet site was joined by all his family as time unspooled.

53_twenty-5 year-old Abraham
Henry Jr.’s next brother, twenty-five year-old Abraham, enlisted Could 22nd, 1861, would move more than to Co. F. of the 17th Virginia Cavalry, get wounded at the third battle of Winchester in September 19, 1864, and turn into a prisoner of war. But he survived the war and died a lot of years later in 1907.

54_Henry Jr.’s younger brother, James Touro (Truro) Shepherd
Henry Jr.’s younger brother, James Touro (Truro) Shepherd, enlisted as a Private Might 1st, 1861 in the 2nd Virginia Infantry. Like several, the rigors of marching below Gen. Stonewall Jackson proved an impetus to transfer out into a Cavalry regiment, and he joined Co. B of Gen. Stuart’s Horse Artillery below John Pelham, with a promotion to very first lieutenant. His service record ends abruptly in the spring of 1862. The Shepherdstown Register in September, 1865 reported him obtaining died in “Richmond City” in March, 1862. His marker dates his death as August 13, 1862, which may be the date of his re-internment into the household burial ground.

Two sons of James H. and his wife, Florence Hamtramck Shepherd have been buried a few feet apart in the loved ones burial ground on Shepherdstown’s New Street adjacent to the Episcopal rectory. Robert F. Shepherd, who joined Co. H, 2nd Va. Infantry, died Could 4, 1862 of pneumonia.

55_Robert F. Shepherd, who joined Co. H, 2nd Va. Infantry
56_Alexander H. Shepherd
Alexander H. Shepherd, who enlisted when he was about twenty-eight April four, 1861 in Co. H of the 2nd Virginia Infantry he died of typhoid fever at Camp Harman close to Fairfax Courthouse September 25-26, 1861.

57_Rezin Davis Shepherd was buried there also
Rezin Davis Shepherd was buried there as well, in his personal time.

He left all his fortune to his daughter, who, considering that 1855, had been a widow.

Wrote the Shepherdstown Register: A Large Estate – the late Rezin D. Shepherd left an estate valued at about ,500,000 all of which goes to his daughter, Mrs. Brooks of Boston. He was born in 1784 (on the lot where the court residence would be constructed). In 1809 he went to New Orleans and engaged in the commission business until 1849 and was the executor of the estate of the late Judah Touro. Mr. Shepherd was formerly a merchant in this city, residing on High Street. He accumulated a extremely large home in New Orleans and was reputed to be one particular of the wealthiest males of that city. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, he returned to Boston and resided for a short time with his daughter and sole heir, Mrs. Gorham Brooks, widow of a son of the late Peter C. Brooks. His estate on High Street was formerly, we think the house of Samuel Dexter.

The Massachusetts Historical Society nowadays displays a cannon donated by the household and acquired by RD – a smaller sized version of the a single that so severely wounded RD’s friend, Judah Touro.

The visiting journalist Trowbridge was established incorrect – the county seat DID go back to the Charlestown Courthouse. Wrote the editors of the Charlestown-primarily based newspaper, The Spirit of Jefferson, in 1894:

58_The Regular College constructing, formerly the town hall
The Typical College developing, formerly the town hall, on Major Street, is a handsome structure, the present of 1 of the Shepherd family members, Rezin D. from which the town takes its name. You will remember that it was used as a court residence considering that the war and the courts of Jefferson county had been held there, one particular Judge Hall sitting on the bench. A political rape was perpetuated on Charlestown, the party in power, fitly termed radicals, thought they had a sure issue of it, built a jail and added a wing to either side of the town hall, but “the greatest laid schemes of mice and males gang af’t aglee.” The fellows that did all this mischief have been turned down by the people and factors took their normal shape and Charlestown was once more the county seat.

Shepherd University started when the county seat of Jefferson County, West Virginia, was moved from Shepherdstown to Charles Town in July 1871. On February 27, 1872, the Legislature of West Virginia passed the following act: “That a branch of the State Regular School be and the same is hereby established at the building known as Shepherd College, in Shepherdstown, in the county of Jefferson.”

59_RD’s descendant, Shepherd Brooks
RD’s descendant, Shepherd Brooks, produced it final when he deeded the property and building over to the School and a 3-particular person board of trustees to maintain it.

As they say, settings reverse, the tide of life had gone out – and – came back in once more.

Lastest Turning Machining News

Willy + snow = Entertaining!

Image by ucumari photography
Received a telephone contact final night from a buddy to inform me that they were going to turn on the snow-generating machine for Willy overnight!
I hear kudos are in order for Jeff who went in late and got it operating. It looked stunning this morning and Willy couldn’t have enjoyed it far more!
(Hope you are not tired of Willy photographs because I have some far more for subsequent week!)

Good Precision Turning photos

Verify out these precision turning photos:

William T. Sherman

Image by dbking
William Tecumseh Sherman Monument
Place: 15th Street at Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Sculptor: Carl Rohl-Smith
Date: 1903
Medium: Bronze

Despite the fact that the Grant Memorial may possibly be the grandest, the Sherman Monument behind the U.S. Treasury is the largest and most complicated of all the Civil War memorials.

Just before the Civil War, Sherman had floundered in life. He graduated from West Point in 1840 and went on to serve in the Mexican War, but resigned his commission in 1853 to enter the banking company. But as banks failed, so did his banking career. When he tried to return to the military he was rebuffed and turned to law but lost the only case he attempted. In 1861, at the outbreak of the Civil War, Sherman was serving as superintendent of a new military college in Louisiana but turned down a commission in the Confederate Army. At age 41, he was reappointed as colonel of the 13th infantry as the standard U.S. army expanded. His memoirs note that he “felt as even though there was now a goal in his life” at this commission. Achieving the rank of commander of the Army of the Tennessee in 1863, Sherman’s “March to the Sea” in the course of the winter of 1864-1865 captured the imagination of the North. This event led the press, who Sherman mistrusted and who disliked him in return, to turn out to be an immensely appealing hero. As a lieutenant basic and then common and commander of the complete army from 1869-1883, Sherman was well-liked among veterans, whose welfare he looked soon after. He was active in veterans’ organizations, in continual demand as a speaker at reunions, dedications, and encampments, and he hardly ever turned down an invitation to “mix with the boys.” When word of his death in February 1891 reached the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, its officers started to plan for a memorial honoring his memory.

Selection of the Sculptor

As with the Grant Memorial (although several years later), members at the society’s summer time encampment voted to erect a memorial to honor him “in the nation’s capitol, the heart of Union he had fought to save.” Congress was asked for and appropriated ,000 to establish the Sherman Monument Commission. The Society speedily established committees in every single state to raise funds, writing solicitation letters to many military organizations of the day, as properly as encouraging each and every Union veteran to contribute to the statue fund “so that when the statue is erected in Washington, each soldier who sees it will really feel that it is a component of his work.” With the plea for funds was an emotional circular to remind veterans of Sherman’s concern for them. In spite of the appeals, only ,469.91 was raised, requiring Congress to double its contribution. By 1895, confident that they would be profitable in raising the final funds needed, the Society announced a competitors to choose a style for the monument. The Society wanted only equestrian models from American artists and asked the National Sculpture Society to help in the selection of the artist.

By April 1896, twenty-3 sculptors had submitted models. Many of the sculptors had submitted models for earlier monumental commissions but had lost. The models were displayed in the basement of the War Department exactly where the public could view them and supply opinions. In mid-Might, the commission announced 4 finalists and the National Sculpture Society sent a delegation of the nation’s most prominent sculptors to evaluate the finalist’s models. The public had favored the most elaborate model, submitted by Danish born Carl Rohl-Smith, but the National Sculpture Society’s judges relegated Rohl-Smith’s design to the bottom, discovering “it is ill conceived and overdone.” Two weeks following the National Sculpture Society’s delegation opined, the Sherman Monument commission announced Rohl-Smith as the winner. The losers had been outraged and cried foul, claiming that the Sherman Monument Commission completely disregarded the opinion of the professionals. The National Sculpture Society also protested the decision. The “Washington Star” newspaper referred to as the competitors a “bunko game.” In June, at the urging of the National Sculpture Society, Sen. Wolcott (CO), who had said the nation’s capital was currently disgraced by adequate poor sculpture, provided a resolution for an inquiry into the award of the Sherman commission. What ensued was a debate that intensified the excellent divide among the “artistic experts” who disliked Rohl-Smith’s model and the public’s need for Rohl-Smith’s style. The wrangling continued until July, with Rohl-Smith possessing to deny that he had any influence in Washington, only the very best style. Lastly, the opposition surrendered and Rohl-Smith went to work on his sculpture.

The Place

Although the choice procedure was contentious at ideal, the choice of the location for Rohl-Smith’s statue, which was going on simultaneously, was significantly easier. A slight incline on the south side of the Treasury creating was identified, given that it was exactly where Sherman had watched the two-day Grand Review of the Union Army in Might 1865. On the first day of the review, Sherman stood silently watching the Army of the Potomac march by in precision. Sherman’s personal guys (the Army of the Tennessee) would pass in overview the second day, and worried they would not measure up to the Army of the Potomac, he rode across the river to their camp and called together all his commanding officers. He described in detail the precision marching of the Army of the Potomac, hoping that the officers would relay this to his guys and inspire them to appear as sharp as the Army of the Potomac. On the second day of the overview, Sherman led the Army of the Tennessee up Pennsylvania Avenue with the military bands playing “Marching Via Georgia,” a new tune in their honor. As he and his band of males neared the rise at the Treasury constructing, Sherman pulled aside, turned facing eastward in his saddle, and with President Johnson and other dignitaries watched his men march down Pennsylvania Avenue toward him and the reviewing dignitaries.
Commenting on the second day of the Grand Assessment, the Washington Star reported that “this day’s men were taller, lankier, more sun beaten that those who had marched the day prior to. Their strides had been longer, more confident. They swung along with an easy grace and their spirits high. They were magnificent.” Crowds along Pennsylvania Avenue cheered them, throwing flowers and Sherman was practically overcome with emotion. In his memoirs he recalls this to be “one of the happiest, most satisfying moments of his life.” For that reason, this spot was selected as the place for the Sherman monument, and the pride Sherman felt watching his males would be captured by Rohl-Smith in the statue itself.

The Sculpture Requires Shape

In 1897, Rohl-Smith set up his studio in a massive barn-like structure that the Secretary of the Treasury constructed for him close to the internet site. The developing integrated an apartment where he and his wife Sara lived whilst he worked. In 1900, obtaining completed models for the equestrian statue and three of the 4 soldiers that would stand guard at the monument’s corners, Rohl-Smith sailed to Denmark for a check out. Although there, he died unexpectedly at age of 52 in Copenhagen. His wife, Sara, asked the Sherman Monument Commission to allow her to arrange the artist who would full the statue and the commission agreed. Sara, along with some of the young Scandinavians who had been working with her husband, effectively directed the completion of the monument making use of her late husband’s original drawings. In August 1903, the Washington Star reported that the initial cast sections of the 14’ tall equestrian statue were arriving at the internet site. Sherman’s torso, hands, arms, shoulders, neck and head comprised the biggest piece.

Design Components

On each and every corner of the tiered platform, facing outward, were placed 4 life size soldiers representing infantry, cavalry, artillery, and engineers. A relief on the north side of the pedestal shows males marching through Georgia as slaves step from their quarters to watch them pass. The relief on the south side depicts the Battle of Atlanta with Sherman and his employees at headquarters as smoke rises from the burning city in the distance. The reliefs on the west and east sides of the pedestal show Sherman walking among his men sleeping about a campfire and the common with his officers on horseback before the Battle of Missionary Ridge. Pairs of medallions bearing bas-reliefs of Sherman’s army and corps commanders (James Birdseye McPherson and Oliver O Howard, John A Logan and Francis Preston Blair, Greenville M. Dodge and Edward G. Ransom, and Benjamin Grierson and Andrew J. Smith) flank the larger reliefs on the east and west sides. Big bronze groups installed halfway up the monument’s east and west sides depict “Peace” and “War”. “Peace,” on the east side, depicts a graceful woman holding an olive branch accompanied by 3 youngsters, one feeding a dove. “War,” on the west side, is a horrible fury, seething with rage and hatred, who tramples humanity in the form of a dead young soldier at her feet. Huge bronze vultures perch on the body about to feast on its flesh, graphically driving home Sherman’s renowned observation that “war is hell.” Inscribed on the north façade is one more Sherman quote: “war’s legitimate object is far more best peace.” Lastly, inscribed in the wide mosaic band around the base of the monument are the a lot of battles in which Sherman participated.

The Dedication Ceremony

The Society of the Army of the Tennessee produced the plans for the dedication of the Sherman Monument. They arranged specific excursion trains to bring veterans to Washington, special hotel rates, and activities for veterans’ wives. As the date of dedication arrived, October 15, 1903, thousands arrived in Washington and filled all hotels, forcing a lot of to keep in hotels as far away as Baltimore and Annapolis. In Washington, miles of bunting and acres of flags decorated firms, properties, and government buildings. The base of the monument itself was entwined with 400’ of garland and at each and every corner stood wreaths 7’ in diameter. On each and every side of the base was a 6’ high shield of red, white, and blue flowers—one for every of the 4 armies. The statue of Sherman was enfolded amongst two enormous American flags suspended on wires whilst far more flags covered the bronze soldiers at the corners. On the reviewing stand for the parade that preceded the ceremonies Turkish carpets have been laid. Overstuffed armchairs for President Theodore Roosevelt and other dignitaries lined the freshly painted railings of the reviewing stand. A lot more than a thousand folding chairs had been arranged in a semi-circle in front for the actual unveiling, with two hundred specific chairs for the “veterans who had left limbs to rot on the battlefield” right at the base of the statue. Specific tables were set aside for the press and the Western Union operators. The parade, which stretched for miles, started at 2:00pm. President Roosevelt could barely include his enthusiasm and kept leaping out of his chair to wave and shout to passing units. The last tune played ahead of the ceremony was “Marching Through Georgia.” Basic Greenville Dodge, president of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, presided. At Dodge’s signal, the late general’s young grandson, William Tecumseh Sherman Thorndike, pulled the cord that parted the flags to show Sherman astride his horse.

The ceremony was unusual among dedications for the eloquence of its speakers. Dedication speeches had previously been patriotic and sentimental, but the speakers at this one particular, particularly President Roosevelt, rose above the standard nostalgia. President Roosevelt’s speech was filled with moving, challenging imagery, since Roosevelt had an agenda and he relished the pulpit afforded to at this dedication ceremony (the nation had only recently completed the Spanish-American War), but his words express thoughts still valid today.

President Roosevelt stated that, as an emerging international power, the nation have to be ever vigilant and often powerful and veterans in the audience roared in agreement. Roosevelt also employed this chance to get in touch with for a strong national defense, chiding opponents by saying, “No man is warranted in feeling pride in the deeds of the Army and Navy of the past if he does not back up the Army and Navy of the present.” Roosevelt wanted no one to rest on previous laurels, calling for Americans to be vigorous, rigorous, up and undertaking noble deeds, and pursuing lofty objectives, stating that heroes like Sherman ought to spur citizens to similar acts. The President named for new patriotism, honesty and vigilance – all qualities exhibited by Sherman and other “great dead.” Roosevelt continued: “The triumphs of the previous must be lessons that, if discovered, would lead to victory in challenges however to come. It is a wonderful and glorious thing for a nation to be stirred to present triumph by the splendid triumphs of the past. But it is a shameful factor for a nation if those memories stir it only to empty boastings…We of the present, if we are correct to the past, need to show by our lives that we have discovered aright the lessons taught by the guys who did the mighty deeds of the previous.” As Roosevelt spoke, the thousands of veterans sitting in front of him, who had done the “mighty deeds” of the past, have been stirred to know that this man wasn’t seeking back in time but forward. He told these assembled that their hard won victories would guide the nation into a glorious future that they would not reside to see but whose destiny they had assured. Through Roosevelt’s guarantee of a sort of immortality, the guys of the armies of the Tennessee, Cumberland, Ohio and the Potomac rose and gave him one particular ovation after another.

“Limited Edition Prints by Damien Hirst: Thr-ser, 2012 (1-inch woodcut spot)” / Paragon Press / Art Basel Hong Kong 2013 / SML.20130523.EOSM.04002.SQ

A couple of nice turning machining photos I located:

“Limited Edition Prints by Damien Hirst: Thr-ser, 2012 (1-inch woodcut spot)” / Paragon Press / Art Basel Hong Kong 2013 / SML.20130523.EOSM.04002.SQ

Image by See-ming Lee 李思明 SML
Woodcut spots from Damien Hirst. This series require no introduction. Each and every print is an abstract representation of a biochemical compound, expressed as a spot colour from circular wood cuts.

It is tough for me to talk about Damien Hirst. On the one hand, I see a gifted and quite talented artist who produces brilliant functions. On the other, an artist-turned-factory who has become so commercialized that he would need to have to come up with all kinds of techniques to pump up performs to please the high demands for his perform.

Andy Warhol likes to say that “making cash is art, and working is art and excellent organization is the ideal art.” But I tend to have a difficulty with art developed purely to make cash. Mondrian’s early performs are brilliant and full of ideas, but the Mondrian after he has becoming the darling of his times left tiny to be desired.

These “limited edition prints” is probably the worse of this trend—making swift bucks in the art market place, every asking approximately four-thousand pounds on today’s market. I have no doubt that these performs are important to supporting the artist’s livelihood and hence makes it possible for him to be the richest living artist in Britain.

Art to me is pure magic, but in these performs I see nothing at all but a money-producing machine disguised as one thing fine but has no soul except the greed inside.

Damien Hirst
Thr-ser (1-inch woodcut spot)
2012
Woodcut
55 editions
Hand signed and numbered

A series of woodcut printed on 410 gsm Somerset White textured paper. Signed by the artist on the front and numbered on the reverse in an edition of 55.

# Damien Hirst

Damien Steven Hirst (born 7 June 1965) is an English artist, entrepreneur and art collector. He is the most prominent member of the group recognized as the Young British Artists (or YBAs), who dominated the art scene in Britain for the duration of the 1990s. He is internationally renowned, and is reportedly Britain’s richest living artist, with his wealth valued at £215m in the 2010 Sunday Occasions Wealthy List. Throughout the 1990s his career was closely linked with the collector Charles Saatchi, but rising frictions came to a head in 2003 and the connection ended.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damien_Hirst

# Paragon Press
www.paragonpress.co.uk/
6 Wetherby Gardens
London SW5 0JN
United Kingdom

# SML Data
+ Date: 2013-05-23T14:35:35+0800
+ Dimensions: 2776 x 2776
+ Exposure: 1/6400 sec at f/2.
+ Focal Length: 22 mm
+ ISO: one hundred
+ Camera: Canon EOS M
+ Lens: Canon EF-M 22mm f/two STM
+ GPS: 22°16’59&quot N 114°10’22&quot E
+ Place: 香港會議展覽中心 Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC)
+ Workflow: Lightroom 4
+ Serial: SML.20130523.EOSM.04002.SQ
+ Series: 新聞攝影 Photojournalism, SML Fine Art, Art Basel Hong Kong 2013

# Media Licensing
Creative Commons (CCBY) See-ming Lee 李思明 / SML Photography / SML Universe Restricted

“Limited Edition Prints by Damien Hirst: Thr-ser, 2012 (1-inch woodcut spot)” / Paragon Press / Art Basel Hong Kong 2013 / SML.20130523.EOSM.04002.SQ
/ #Photojournalism #CreativeCommons #CCBY #SMLPhotography #SMLUniverse #SMLFineArt #Crazyisgood #SMLProjects
/ #中國 #中国 #China #香港 #HongKong #攝影 #摄影 #photography #Art #FineArt #ArtBasel #ABHK #DamienHirst #ParagonPress #woodcut #prints #spot #colorist #abstract

www.flickr.com/photographs/seeminglee/8864290568/

Cinema MACHINE. Riverside

Image by Donatas Grinius
2011 06

DIPLOMA Function
VILNIUS GEDIMINAS TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY
Place: NEW YORK, Extended ISLAND CITY
Kind: PUBLIC Creating

The theaters
All theater screens are turned to Manhattan and they rotate on a horizontal axis. Visitors can appreciate the fascinating skyline prior to the film starts and individuals from Manhattan can see the screens open and close.

Cool Surface Grinding Aluminum images

A handful of good surface grinding aluminum photos I discovered:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Space Shuttle Enterprise (starboard full view, aft)

Image by Chris Devers

See far more images of this, and the Wikipedia write-up.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Space Shuttle Enterprise:

Manufacturer:
Rockwell International Corporation

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 57 ft. tall x 122 ft. long x 78 ft. wing span, 150,000 lb.
(1737.36 x 3718.57 x 2377.44cm, 68039.6kg)

Components:
Aluminum airframe and physique with some fiberglass features payload bay doors are graphite epoxy composite thermal tiles are simulated (polyurethane foam) except for test samples of actual tiles and thermal blankets.

The 1st Space Shuttle orbiter, &quotEnterprise,&quot is a full-scale test vehicle utilised for flights in the atmosphere and tests on the ground it is not equipped for spaceflight. Although the airframe and flight control components are like those of the Shuttles flown in space, this car has no propulsion method and only simulated thermal tiles because these features have been not needed for atmospheric and ground tests. &quotEnterprise&quot was rolled out at Rockwell International’s assembly facility in Palmdale, California, in 1976. In 1977, it entered service for a nine-month-extended method-and-landing test flight program. Thereafter it was utilized for vibration tests and fit checks at NASA centers, and it also appeared in the 1983 Paris Air Show and the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans. In 1985, NASA transferred &quotEnterprise&quot to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum.

Transferred from National Aeronautics and Space Administration

• • •

Quoting from Wikipedia | Space Shuttle Enterprise:

The Space Shuttle Enterprise (NASA Orbiter Automobile Designation: OV-101) was the first Space Shuttle orbiter. It was built for NASA as component of the Space Shuttle plan to perform test flights in the atmosphere. It was constructed with no engines or a functional heat shield, and was therefore not capable of spaceflight.

Initially, Enterprise had been intended to be refitted for orbital flight, which would have produced it the second space shuttle to fly soon after Columbia. Nevertheless, throughout the construction of Columbia, information of the final design and style changed, especially with regard to the weight of the fuselage and wings. Refitting Enterprise for spaceflight would have involved dismantling the orbiter and returning the sections to subcontractors across the nation. As this was an expensive proposition, it was determined to be significantly less costly to construct Challenger around a body frame (STA-099) that had been developed as a test article. Similarly, Enterprise was regarded as for refit to replace Challenger right after the latter was destroyed, but Endeavour was built from structural spares as an alternative.

Service

Building started on the initial orbiter on June 4, 1974. Designated OV-101, it was originally planned to be named Constitution and unveiled on Constitution Day, September 17, 1976. A write-in campaign by Trekkies to President Gerald Ford asked that the orbiter be named following the Starship Enterprise, featured on the tv show Star Trek. Despite the fact that Ford did not mention the campaign, the president—who throughout Globe War II had served on the aircraft carrier USS&nbspMonterey&nbsp(CVL-26) that served with USS&nbspEnterprise&nbsp(CV-6)—said that he was &quotpartial to the name&quot and overrode NASA officials.

The style of OV-101 was not the exact same as that planned for OV-102, the initial flight model the tail was constructed differently, and it did not have the interfaces to mount OMS pods. A massive quantity of subsystems—ranging from main engines to radar equipment—were not installed on this vehicle, but the capacity to add them in the future was retained. Rather of a thermal protection technique, its surface was primarily fiberglass.

In mid-1976, the orbiter was utilised for ground vibration tests, permitting engineers to evaluate information from an actual flight automobile with theoretical models.

On September 17, 1976, Enterprise was rolled out of Rockwell’s plant at Palmdale, California. In recognition of its fictional namesake, Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry and most of the principal cast of the original series of Star Trek had been on hand at the dedication ceremony.

Strategy and landing tests (ALT)

Main article: Strategy and Landing Tests

On January 31, 1977, it was taken by road to Dryden Flight Study Center at Edwards Air Force Base, to commence operational testing.

While at NASA Dryden, Enterprise was utilized by NASA for a variety of ground and flight tests intended to validate aspects of the shuttle system. The initial nine-month testing period was referred to by the acronym ALT, for &quotApproach and Landing Test&quot. These tests integrated a maiden &quotflight&quot on February 18, 1977 atop a Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) to measure structural loads and ground handling and braking traits of the mated method. Ground tests of all orbiter subsystems had been carried out to confirm functionality prior to atmospheric flight.

The mated Enterprise/SCA combination was then subjected to 5 test flights with Enterprise unmanned and unactivated. The objective of these test flights was to measure the flight qualities of the mated mixture. These tests had been followed with three test flights with Enterprise manned to test the shuttle flight manage systems.

Enterprise underwent five totally free flights where the craft separated from the SCA and was landed beneath astronaut manage. These tests verified the flight qualities of the orbiter design and were carried out under a number of aerodynamic and weight configurations. On the fifth and final glider flight, pilot-induced oscillation difficulties had been revealed, which had to be addressed before the first orbital launch occurred.

On August 12, 1977, the space shuttle Enterprise flew on its personal for the 1st time.

Preparation for STS-1

Following the ALT plan, Enterprise was ferried among a number of NASA facilities to configure the craft for vibration testing. In June 1979, it was mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters (known as a boilerplate configuration) and tested in a launch configuration at Kennedy Space Center Launch Pad 39A.

Retirement

With the completion of vital testing, Enterprise was partially disassembled to let certain elements to be reused in other shuttles, then underwent an international tour going to France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the U.S. states of California, Alabama, and Louisiana (during the 1984 Louisiana Globe Exposition). It was also employed to match-verify the never ever-employed shuttle launch pad at Vandenberg AFB, California. Finally, on November 18, 1985, Enterprise was ferried to Washington, D.C., exactly where it became property of the Smithsonian Institution.

Post-Challenger

Right after the Challenger disaster, NASA regarded making use of Enterprise as a replacement. However refitting the shuttle with all of the essential equipment needed for it to be utilised in space was regarded as, but as an alternative it was decided to use spares constructed at the same time as Discovery and Atlantis to develop Endeavour.

Post-Columbia

In 2003, right after the breakup of Columbia in the course of re-entry, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board performed tests at Southwest Research Institute, which employed an air gun to shoot foam blocks of similar size, mass and speed to that which struck Columbia at a test structure which mechanically replicated the orbiter wing leading edge. They removed a fiberglass panel from Enterprise’s wing to perform analysis of the material and attached it to the test structure, then shot a foam block at it. Although the panel was not broken as a result of the test, the influence was enough to permanently deform a seal. As the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panel on Columbia was 2.5 times weaker, this recommended that the RCC major edge would have been shattered. Additional tests on the fiberglass had been canceled in order not to threat damaging the test apparatus, and a panel from Discovery was tested to decide the effects of the foam on a similarly-aged RCC leading edge. On July 7, 2003, a foam effect test produced a hole 41&nbspcm by 42.five&nbspcm (16.1&nbspinches by 16.7&nbspinches) in the protective RCC panel. The tests clearly demonstrated that a foam impact of the variety Columbia sustained could seriously breach the protective RCC panels on the wing major edge.

The board determined that the probable lead to of the accident was that the foam influence triggered a breach of a reinforced carbon-carbon panel along the top edge of Columbia’s left wing, permitting hot gases generated in the course of re-entry to enter the wing and cause structural collapse. This brought on Columbia to spin out of handle, breaking up with the loss of the complete crew.

Museum exhibit

Enterprise was stored at the Smithsonian’s hangar at Washington Dulles International Airport prior to it was restored and moved to the newly constructed Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum‘s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center at Dulles International Airport, where it has been the centerpiece of the space collection. On April 12, 2011, NASA announced that Space Shuttle Discovery, the most traveled orbiter in the fleet, will be added to the collection once the Shuttle fleet is retired. When that happens, Enterprise will be moved to the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum in New York City, to a newly constructed hangar adjacent to the museum. In preparation for the anticipated relocation, engineers evaluated the automobile in early 2010 and determined that it was protected to fly on the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft once once more.

Good Machining Business photographs

Check out these machining company photos:

Girls workers set up fixtures and assemblies to a tail fuselage section of a B-17 bomber at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant, Extended Beach, Calif. Much better identified as the “Flying Fortress,” the B-17F is a later model of the B-17, which distinguished itself i

Image by The Library of Congress
Palmer, Alfred T.,, photographer.

Females workers set up fixtures and assemblies to a tail fuselage section of a B-17 bomber at the Douglas Aircraft Organization plant, Extended Beach, Calif. Far better known as the &quotFlying Fortress,&quot the B-17F is a later model of the B-17, which distinguished itself in action in the south Pacific, Germany and elsewhere. It is a extended variety, high altitude, heavy bomber, with a crew of seven to nine men, and with armament adequate to defend itself on daylight missions

1942 Oct.

1 transparency : color.

Notes:
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
Douglas Aircraft Business
Airplane market
Females
World War, 1939-1945
Assembly-line methods
United States–California–Long Beach

Format: Transparencies–Color

Rights Info: No identified restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Collection 12002-39 (DLC) 93845501

General details about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is offered at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Larger resolution image is offered (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a35337
hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3j00093
hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c28017

Get in touch with Quantity: LC-USW36-103

Avro Canada CF-one hundred Canuck

Image by bill barber
On a pedestal in the park close to Algonguin Hwy, Haliburton, Ontario. Initially stationed at Camp Borden, Ontario.

The Avro Canada CF-one hundred Canuck (affectionately identified as the Clunk) was a Canadian jet fighter serving in the course of the Cold War. It was the only Canadian-designed fighter to enter mass production. The CF-one hundred is not considered to be genuinely supersonic given that it could not exceed the speed of sound in level flight. Nevertheless, on 18 December 1952, S/L Janusz Żurakowski, the Avro business chief improvement test pilot, broke the sound barrier flying the CF-one hundred Mk four prototype in a dive from 30,000 feet.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Canada_CF-one hundred

7_When he was just nine years old

Some cool surface grinding manufacturer images:

7_When he was just nine years old

Image by Jim Surkamp
Money Wizard R. D. Shepherd and His Fabled Building – McMurran Hall, Shepherdstown, WV by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/?p=13106 7907 words.

Made possible with the generous, community-minded support of American Public University, offering a quality, online education. The interpretations of posts in civilwarscholars.com do not in any way reflect the modern-day policies of the University. More at apus.edu

Patriarch R. D. Shepherd’s Homecoming 1859

1_About how a young boy from Shepherdstown
About how a young boy from Shepherdstown built a massive fortune through work, smarts and an act of his own heroism for another; then, turns around and gives much of it back as McMurran Hall, an Almshouse in New Orleans and other gifts.

2_R. D. Shepherd had a strict, flinty way
R. D. Shepherd had a strict, flinty way, but on paper and in the world at large did his huge generosities stand tall, pervade the landscape and enrich the hearts of humanity.

3_Seventy-five-year-old Rezin
Seventy-five-year-old Rezin Davis Shepherd, described by the New Orleans Picayune as having “the largest and most productive estate which has ever been held by one person in this city and State” – began the construction Thursday, October 6th, 1859 of a gift to his home town, this time right on lot no. 1 in Shepherdstown, the very lot where he was born in August 1, 1784.

4_Who knew that in ten fleeting day
Who knew that in ten fleeting days – October 16th – history would be blown off its hinges by the John Brown raiders’ attack fifteen miles away at Harpers Ferry, the match that lit the simmering fever of division between

5_North and South over slavery
North and South over slavery and claimed rights to secede from the Union. The tempest raged back and forth over the county and the town for 1300 hundred days of pitiless strife and war before settling back into being a barren, alien landscape.

6_RD’s building
RD’s (“RD” henceforth for “Rezin Davis Shepherd”) building – beautiful as were all his buildings remains a Greek Revival style, with a two-story-portico and Corinthian flourishes. But in the 1860s, it would bear witness to all that was rent asunder and itself narrowly avoid destruction, unlike a less lucky altruistic juggernaut project of Shepherd’s in New Orleans – the palatial Almshouse. But this, RD’s Town Hall, first named, would eventually live a “long, happy life” first as the County Court, then into its present-day majesty as the signature building of Shepherd University.

Growing Up – RD Learns the Trade:

7_When he was just nine years old
8_placed him in the store and counting house
When he was just nine years old, RD’s father, Abraham, placed him in the store and counting house in Baltimore of William Taylor,

9_an ambitious importer and ship-owner
an ambitious importer and ship-owner. RD’s incredible gifts surfaced when he – just eighteen – was sent to New Orleans to assure a good return on a huge shipment of British goods his firm had purchased for New Orleans’ customers. Then his first big “killing” was with another fresh-faced, hard-driving Taylor colleague, James McDonough. Wrote the Picayune: In October, 1803, it was well known throughout the country that Louisiana had been purchased by the United States. Mr. Taylor was the only merchant who seemed to comprehend the profit from one consequence of the this great political event.

10_in becoming a state
11_all sugar imports thereafter
12_cornered 1800 of those hogsheads
The firm realized that in becoming a state, a duty of 2.5 cents would be added to the price of all sugar imports thereafter. So Shepherd and McDonough – when all the sugar produced in the state was between 2100-2200 hogsheads – cornered 1800 of those hogsheads, giving young RD “a handsome capital for a young man to start in mercantile life.” He soon created a new firm shared with Taylor, then in time through age and retirement became RD’s alone.

13_Coming into his own
Coming into his own, he married Lucy Taylor Gorham of Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1808, who was “a niece and adopted daughter” of Taylor. On August 22nd, 1809, their only child, Ellen Shepherd, was born in Louisiana. (Lucy would die in 1814).

14_the penchant of RD
It was at this juncture the penchant of RD for regular, publicity-averse benefactions took root, in the moment of his willed defiance against a direct military order to work, instead, to save one particular wounded man, left for dead in war, a man who himself would live on to become the epitome of the proverbial Good Man, albeit

15_His name was Judah Touro
extraordinarily wealthy. His name was Judah Touro, a top-hatted, but humble Jewish businessman who believed in respect for all religions and daily applications of the code of good works. He was beloved throughout his circles and region as “the Israelite without guile.”

Wrote Author Colyar:

16_Wrote Author Colyar
17_carrying ammunition on the battle field
While carrying ammunition on the battle field Jan. 1, 1815 Mr. Touro was struck by a 12-pound shot which tore

18_12-pound shot
19_a large mass of flesh from the thigh
a large mass of flesh from the thigh and prostrated him among the dead and dying. Mr. Rezin Shepherd, was carrying a special order from Commodore Patterson across the river to the main army. On reaching the bank he met a friend, who told him his friend Touro was dead. Inquiring where he was, Shepherd was informed that he had been taken to

20_Jackson’s headquarters
an old building in the rear of Jackson’s headquarters. Forgetting his orders, Mr. Shepherd went immediately to the place and found he was not dead, but, as the surgeon said, in a dying condition. Disregarding what the surgeon said, Shepherd got a cart, put him in it, administered stimulants, and took Touro to his own house. He then procured nurses, and by the closest attention, Mr. Touro’s life was saved. Mr. Shepherd returned late in the day,

21_Commodore Patterson in a bad humor
having performed his mission, to find Commodore Patterson in a bad humor, and, speaking severely to him, the latter said: “Commodore, you can hang or shoot me, and it will be all right, but my best friend needed my assistance, and nothing on earth could have induced me to neglect him.”

RD’s businesses continued to grow exponentially and his brother, James Hervey Shepherd, was summoned from Shepherdstown to assist.

22_Shepherd, was summoned from Shepherdstown to assist.
1817-1837 – RD travels to Europe, settles in Boston doting on his daughter’s education.

23_1822 – RD maintained his businesses
24_at 5 Pearl Street and nearby 28 Indian Wharf house.
1822 – RD maintained his businesses and shipping concerns at 5 Pearl Street and nearby 28 Indian Wharf house.

25_her portrait painted by Thomas Sully
26_Gilbert Stuart is commissioned to paint his own portrait
He has her portrait painted by Thomas Sully in 1831, a few years after Gilbert Stuart is commissioned to paint his own portrait. (Stuart died in 1828).

1829, April 20 – Ellen Shepherd marries Gorham Brooks of Medford, Massachusetts.

1834 – RD commissions Samuel Fuller to build the 480-ton merchant ship in Medford, named after his daughter, the “Ellen Brooks.”

27_James Hervey Shepherd dies
1837 – James Hervey Shepherd dies. RD returns to run businesses in New Orleans.

1837, July 23 – Ellen (Shepherd) Brooks and her husband, usually in Boston or Medford, temporarily reside in Baltimore.

28_nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr.
1837-1865 – RD’s nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr., who was brought up in his uncle’s counting room, gradually assumes the role as RD’s agent in New Orleans.

29_painting of the ship the “Ellen Brooks” is completed
1839 – RD’s commissioned painting of the ship the “Ellen Brooks” is completed, attributed to Samuel Walters (British, 1811-1882), called “Ellen Brooks, Off Holyhead, Homeward Bound.”

1841 – RD buys 468 acres of land and begins building Wild Goose Farm, but not yet living there full-time; he also pays for most of the remodeling of the original Trinity Episcopal Church in Shepherdstown.

1842, June – RD signs a petition to Congress along with numerous other planters and sugar manufacturers in the state of Louisiana that asks for an increase in the duties on imported sugar.

1849 – RD places responsibilities on his eighteen-year-old nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr., who would become his agent in New Orleans through the Civil War, allowing RD to return more permanently to his Wild Goose Farm.

30_Wild Goose Farm
31_the 1850 Census shows
32_1850 and 1860 Census slave schedules
1850 – In Shepherdstown & Wild Goose Farm; the 1850 Census shows 66-year-old RD with a period worth of 0,000, living only with workmen: 26-year-old German-born master stonemason Conrad Smith and an overseer. Although one account states Touro stipulated that RD free his enslaved persons, RD is shown to having owned numerous persons, enumerated in both the 1850 and 1860 Census slave schedules.

1854, January 6th – Touro’s Will makes Rezin Davis Shepherd residuary legatee of the estate and executor; 5,000 is willed to specific recipients. A sum iof ,000 is set aside for a palatial almshouse, with the added stipulation to RD that more sums, if needed, should be used to complete this priority project.

Judah Touro made out his will January 6, 1854 a few days before his death that said:

33_my dear, old, and devoted friend, Rezin Davis Shepherd
34_I hereby appoint and institute him
As regards my other designated executor, say my dear, old, and devoted friend, Rezin Davis Shepherd, to whom, under Divine Providence, I am greatly indebted for the preservation of my life when I was wounded on the 1st of January, 1815, I hereby appoint and institute him, the said Rezin Davis Shepherd, after payment of my particular legacies, and the debts of my succession, the universal legatee of the rest and residue of my estates, movable and immovable.

35_funded remodeling of the Trinity
RD continued his projects both in New Orleans and Shepherdstown. He had already funded remodeling of the Trinity

36_planned a clock and bell to its original church
Episcopal Church. He planned a clock and bell to its original church then after some legal squabbling – the clock – to everyone’s assent – was reassigned to be inserted in to the new government building.

The Shepherd Family is Scattered By War:

37_The war hit the family hard
The war hit the family hard. Most of the young men enlisted in Virginia units. RD had to recalibrate his business strategies. Wrote the Richmond Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861:
The New Orleans Delta states that R. D. Shepherd, Esq., who is now at an advanced time of life, living on his beautiful farm near Shepherdstown, Virginia, has directed his agent in New Orleans to pay over to the treasurer of the Confederate States a large sum of money, including, it is said, his whole annual income from rents in that city — the largest income enjoyed by any property holder — to be applied to the defence of the rights and the support of the independence of the South.

38_spring of 1862 when Federal General Banks
In the spring of 1862 when Federal General Banks with his army entered into Jefferson County, RD took refuge in Boston with his daughter.

39_As the war progressed
As the war progressed, its maw of destruction came closer to Shepherdstown’s nearly complete building. 130,000 troops moved in the area in September, 1862 for the bloody Maryland Campaign, just across the Potomac river. Wounded from the nearby battles poured into Shepherdstown, putting the unfinished Town Hall into service as an outdoor hospital.

Wrote Mary Bedinger Mitchell:

40_The unfinished Town Hall had stood in naked ugliness
The unfinished Town Hall had stood in naked ugliness for many a long day. Somebody threw a few rough boards across the beams, placed piles of straw over them, laid down single planks to walk upon, and lo, it was a hospital at once.

There were six churches and they were all full, the barn-like place known as the Drill Room, all the private houses after their capacity, the shops and empty buildings, the school-houses – every inch of space and yet the cry was for more room.

We went about our work with pale faces and trembling hands, yet trying to appear composed for the sake of our patients, who were much excited. We could hear the incessant explosions of artillery, the shrieking whistles of the shells, and the sharper, deadlier more thrilling roll of musketry; while every now and then the echo of some charging cheer would come, borne by the wind, and as the human voice would pierce that demoniacal clangor we would catch out breath and listen, and try not to sob, and turn back to the forlorn hospitals, to the suffering at our feet and before our eyes while imagination fainted at the thought of those other scenes hidden from us beyond the Potomac.

Had Federal General George McClellan crossed the Potomac and pursued General Lee’s scattered and mauled army, as historians have much criticized him since for not doing, Shepherdstown would have likely suffered greater damage, but, as it was, shells landed in the yards of the Lees and Morgans and one or two even hit Shepherd’s new Town Hall, but were of little consequence.

Property Losses in New Orleans:

41_RD’s fine residence at 18 Bourbon Street
42_18 Bourbon Street in New Orleans
More invasive, improvised use was being made of RD’s fine residence at 18 Bourbon Street in New Orleans, causing his nephew to formally appeal to the Federal powers-that-be in early 1864. He wrote:

43_From Brig. General James Bowen
January 29, 1864
From Brig. General James Bowen
Provost Marshal General
Department of the Gulf.

Sir:
The undersigned acting as the duly authorized agent and attorney in fact of Rezin Davis Shepherd, formerly the State of Virginia, but for more than eight months past residing with his daughter Mrs. Gorham Brooks in the city of Boston and State of Massachusetts, respectfully represents: That the said Shepherd is a loyal citizen of the United States and the true and lawful owner of the Brick Dwelling No. 18 Bourbon Street between Canal and Custom House Streets in the City of New Orleans and also of all the furniture and contents thereof: that in the month of June, 1862 Col. Stafford without show of authority, placed in possession of said house and contents, a man by the name of Horton or Houghton, who has ever since occupied and now occupied and uses the same as a Boarding House, and who never has paid any rent or compensation there and continually refused to do so.

Under the circumstances, the undersigned respectfully appeals to you, General, for relief, and asks that the matter be referred to Capt. Edward Page and Thomas Tileston, or other of them for investigation and that the aforesaid premises and contents be restored to the possession of the owner without delay; Henry Shepherd Jr.

Like The Town Hall, the huge, magnificent Almshouse in New Orleans remained unfinished, to be hit by a worse fate. Shepherd was charged by Touro’s will to first put ,00 toward its construction, then be prepared to put more money into its construction- including even some of Shepherd’s own funds – as recipient of Touro’s residue.

44_occupied by detachments of the 2nd Maine Cavalry
45_The fire started
46_Baked beans fired the building
On September 1, 1865, at a time the Almshouse in New Orleans – still with an unfinished, floorless top floor – was occupied by detachments of the 2nd Maine Cavalry and Company K, First Louisiana Cavalry. A baking oven was in heavy use at one end of the building so that heat would be carried through a fissure in a ventilation system close by. The fire started in the rafters above the third floor. It was night-time with a high wind and no flooring yet laid for the third floor in that wing. Coals dripping from the fire then ignited tar on the lower walls. “Baked beans fired the building” said one from the 2nd Maine Cavalry. The building was uninsured. Just a few months later R. D. Shepherd died of typhoid fever, November 10, 1865, no longer the executor of the estate, leaving no philanthropist to help make up the loss.

Wrote the editors of the Times-Picayune in a long obituary:
In his native village he erected a splendid building, designed for a town hall, also a large academy, with beautiful grounds and a walk. He also deposited with the Mayor annually a large sum to buy fuel and provisions for the poor. He also erected the largest and most costly church in Jefferson County. Many other acts of public and private benevolence were performed by him in his quiet, furtive manner.

With war ended and when he was still healthy, RD had urged that his Town Hall become the County Court since the Charlestown courthouse was a battle-scarred ruin, especially from a shelling it took in the fall of 1863.

A Visitor Contemplates Charlestown’s Ruined Courthouse in mid-1865:

47_the court-house, where that mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin
48_Four massive white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof
A short walk up into the centre of the town took us to the scene of John Brown’s trial. It was a consolation to see that the jail had been laid in ashes, and that the court-house, where that mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin abandoned to rats and toads. Four massive white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof, through which God’s blue sky and gracious sunshine smiled. The main portion of the building had been literally torn to pieces. In the floor-less hall of justice rank weeds were growing.

49_Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the walls
Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the walls. No torch had been applied to the wood-work, but the work of destruction had been performed by the hands of hilarious soldier-boys ripping up floors and pulling down laths and joists to the tune of “John Brown,” the swelling melody of the song, and the accompaniment of crashing partitions, reminding the citizens, who thought to have destroyed the old hero, that his soul was marching on. It was also a consolation to know that the court-house and jail would probably never be rebuilt, the county-seat having been removed from Charlestown to Shepherdstown — “forever,” say the resolute loyal citizens of Jefferson County, who rose to vote it back again.

50_either buried in Elmwood Cemetery or the Shepherd Burial Ground
The Shepherd boys who enlisted in Virginia companies each – over time – came home and were either buried in Elmwood Cemetery or the Shepherd Burial Ground – or lived.

51_Clarence Edward Shepherd
Clarence Edward Shepherd became a teacher in Maryland.

While RD’s nephew and agent, Henry Shepherd Jr. was in New Orleans during the war, minding the family interests, three of his brothers were at war. The eldest Rezin Davis, his older brother who had a young family

52_eldest Rezin Davis, his older brother who had a young family
since 1858, died of disease November 2, 1862 at his “river cottage” after imprisonment in the Old Capitol Prison for being an associate of Confederate spy, Redmond Burke. He left his widow, Elizabeth Boteler Stockton Shepherd, two children (Fannie and Alexandria) and a third (David) on the way. Probably first buried on his farm, Rezin Shepherd (a nephew of the patriarch) was reburied after peace came in the new Elmwood Cemetery. His site was joined by all his family as time unspooled.

53_twenty-five year-old Abraham
Henry Jr.’s next brother, twenty-five year-old Abraham, enlisted May 22nd, 1861, would move over to Co. F. of the 17th Virginia Cavalry, get wounded at the third battle of Winchester in September 19, 1864, and become a prisoner of war. But he survived the war and died many years later in 1907.

54_Henry Jr.’s younger brother, James Touro (Truro) Shepherd
Henry Jr.’s younger brother, James Touro (Truro) Shepherd, enlisted as a Private May 1st, 1861 in the 2nd Virginia Infantry. Like many, the rigors of marching under Gen. Stonewall Jackson proved an impetus to transfer out into a Cavalry regiment, and he joined Co. B of Gen. Stuart’s Horse Artillery under John Pelham, with a promotion to first lieutenant. His service record ends abruptly in the spring of 1862. The Shepherdstown Register in September, 1865 reported him having died in “Richmond City” in March, 1862. His marker dates his death as August 13, 1862, which may be the date of his re-internment into the family burial ground.

Two sons of James H. and his wife, Florence Hamtramck Shepherd were buried a few feet apart in the family burial ground on Shepherdstown’s New Street adjacent to the Episcopal rectory. Robert F. Shepherd, who joined Co. H, 2nd Va. Infantry, died May 4, 1862 of pneumonia.

55_Robert F. Shepherd, who joined Co. H, 2nd Va. Infantry
56_Alexander H. Shepherd
Alexander H. Shepherd, who enlisted when he was about twenty-eight April 4, 1861 in Co. H of the 2nd Virginia Infantry; he died of typhoid fever at Camp Harman near Fairfax Courthouse September 25-26, 1861.

57_Rezin Davis Shepherd was buried there too
Rezin Davis Shepherd was buried there too, in his own time.

He left all his fortune to his daughter, who, since 1855, had been a widow.

Wrote the Shepherdstown Register: A Large Estate – the late Rezin D. Shepherd left an estate valued at about ,500,000 all of which goes to his daughter, Mrs. Brooks of Boston. He was born in 1784 (on the lot where the court house would be built). In 1809 he went to New Orleans and engaged in the commission business until 1849 and was the executor of the estate of the late Judah Touro. Mr. Shepherd was formerly a merchant in this city, residing on High Street. He accumulated a very large property in New Orleans and was reputed to be one of the wealthiest men of that city. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, he returned to Boston and resided for a short time with his daughter and sole heir, Mrs. Gorham Brooks, widow of a son of the late Peter C. Brooks. His estate on High Street was formerly, we believe the property of Samuel Dexter.

The Massachusetts Historical Society today displays a cannon donated by the family and acquired by RD – a smaller version of the one that so severely wounded RD’s friend, Judah Touro.

The visiting journalist Trowbridge was proven wrong – the county seat DID go back to the Charlestown Courthouse. Wrote the editors of the Charlestown-based newspaper, The Spirit of Jefferson, in 1894:

58_The Normal College building, formerly the town hall
The Normal College building, formerly the town hall, on Main Street, is a handsome structure, the gift of one of the Shepherd family, Rezin D. from which the town takes its name. You will remember that it was used as a court house since the war and the courts of Jefferson county were held there, one Judge Hall sitting on the bench. A political rape was perpetuated on Charlestown, the party in power, fitly termed radicals, thought they had a sure thing of it, built a jail and added a wing to either side of the town hall, but “the best laid schemes of mice and men gang af’t aglee.” The fellows that did all this mischief were turned down by the people and things took their normal shape and Charlestown was again the county seat.

Shepherd University began when the county seat of Jefferson County, West Virginia, was moved from Shepherdstown to Charles Town in July 1871. On February 27, 1872, the Legislature of West Virginia passed the following act: “That a branch of the State Normal School be and the same is hereby established at the building known as Shepherd College, in Shepherdstown, in the county of Jefferson.”

59_RD’s descendant, Shepherd Brooks
RD’s descendant, Shepherd Brooks, made it final when he deeded the property and building over to the School and a three-person board of trustees to maintain it.

As they say, settings reverse, the tide of life had gone out – and – came back in again.

49_Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the walls

Image by Jim Surkamp
Money Wizard R. D. Shepherd and His Fabled Building – McMurran Hall, Shepherdstown, WV by Jim Surkamp
civilwarscholars.com/?p=13106 7907 words.

Made possible with the generous, community-minded support of American Public University, offering a quality, online education. The interpretations of posts in civilwarscholars.com do not in any way reflect the modern-day policies of the University. More at apus.edu

Patriarch R. D. Shepherd’s Homecoming 1859

1_About how a young boy from Shepherdstown
About how a young boy from Shepherdstown built a massive fortune through work, smarts and an act of his own heroism for another; then, turns around and gives much of it back as McMurran Hall, an Almshouse in New Orleans and other gifts.

2_R. D. Shepherd had a strict, flinty way
R. D. Shepherd had a strict, flinty way, but on paper and in the world at large did his huge generosities stand tall, pervade the landscape and enrich the hearts of humanity.

3_Seventy-five-year-old Rezin
Seventy-five-year-old Rezin Davis Shepherd, described by the New Orleans Picayune as having “the largest and most productive estate which has ever been held by one person in this city and State” – began the construction Thursday, October 6th, 1859 of a gift to his home town, this time right on lot no. 1 in Shepherdstown, the very lot where he was born in August 1, 1784.

4_Who knew that in ten fleeting day
Who knew that in ten fleeting days – October 16th – history would be blown off its hinges by the John Brown raiders’ attack fifteen miles away at Harpers Ferry, the match that lit the simmering fever of division between

5_North and South over slavery
North and South over slavery and claimed rights to secede from the Union. The tempest raged back and forth over the county and the town for 1300 hundred days of pitiless strife and war before settling back into being a barren, alien landscape.

6_RD’s building
RD’s (“RD” henceforth for “Rezin Davis Shepherd”) building – beautiful as were all his buildings remains a Greek Revival style, with a two-story-portico and Corinthian flourishes. But in the 1860s, it would bear witness to all that was rent asunder and itself narrowly avoid destruction, unlike a less lucky altruistic juggernaut project of Shepherd’s in New Orleans – the palatial Almshouse. But this, RD’s Town Hall, first named, would eventually live a “long, happy life” first as the County Court, then into its present-day majesty as the signature building of Shepherd University.

Growing Up – RD Learns the Trade:

7_When he was just nine years old
8_placed him in the store and counting house
When he was just nine years old, RD’s father, Abraham, placed him in the store and counting house in Baltimore of William Taylor,

9_an ambitious importer and ship-owner
an ambitious importer and ship-owner. RD’s incredible gifts surfaced when he – just eighteen – was sent to New Orleans to assure a good return on a huge shipment of British goods his firm had purchased for New Orleans’ customers. Then his first big “killing” was with another fresh-faced, hard-driving Taylor colleague, James McDonough. Wrote the Picayune: In October, 1803, it was well known throughout the country that Louisiana had been purchased by the United States. Mr. Taylor was the only merchant who seemed to comprehend the profit from one consequence of the this great political event.

10_in becoming a state
11_all sugar imports thereafter
12_cornered 1800 of those hogsheads
The firm realized that in becoming a state, a duty of 2.5 cents would be added to the price of all sugar imports thereafter. So Shepherd and McDonough – when all the sugar produced in the state was between 2100-2200 hogsheads – cornered 1800 of those hogsheads, giving young RD “a handsome capital for a young man to start in mercantile life.” He soon created a new firm shared with Taylor, then in time through age and retirement became RD’s alone.

13_Coming into his own
Coming into his own, he married Lucy Taylor Gorham of Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1808, who was “a niece and adopted daughter” of Taylor. On August 22nd, 1809, their only child, Ellen Shepherd, was born in Louisiana. (Lucy would die in 1814).

14_the penchant of RD
It was at this juncture the penchant of RD for regular, publicity-averse benefactions took root, in the moment of his willed defiance against a direct military order to work, instead, to save one particular wounded man, left for dead in war, a man who himself would live on to become the epitome of the proverbial Good Man, albeit

15_His name was Judah Touro
extraordinarily wealthy. His name was Judah Touro, a top-hatted, but humble Jewish businessman who believed in respect for all religions and daily applications of the code of good works. He was beloved throughout his circles and region as “the Israelite without guile.”

Wrote Author Colyar:

16_Wrote Author Colyar
17_carrying ammunition on the battle field
While carrying ammunition on the battle field Jan. 1, 1815 Mr. Touro was struck by a 12-pound shot which tore

18_12-pound shot
19_a large mass of flesh from the thigh
a large mass of flesh from the thigh and prostrated him among the dead and dying. Mr. Rezin Shepherd, was carrying a special order from Commodore Patterson across the river to the main army. On reaching the bank he met a friend, who told him his friend Touro was dead. Inquiring where he was, Shepherd was informed that he had been taken to

20_Jackson’s headquarters
an old building in the rear of Jackson’s headquarters. Forgetting his orders, Mr. Shepherd went immediately to the place and found he was not dead, but, as the surgeon said, in a dying condition. Disregarding what the surgeon said, Shepherd got a cart, put him in it, administered stimulants, and took Touro to his own house. He then procured nurses, and by the closest attention, Mr. Touro’s life was saved. Mr. Shepherd returned late in the day,

21_Commodore Patterson in a bad humor
having performed his mission, to find Commodore Patterson in a bad humor, and, speaking severely to him, the latter said: “Commodore, you can hang or shoot me, and it will be all right, but my best friend needed my assistance, and nothing on earth could have induced me to neglect him.”

RD’s businesses continued to grow exponentially and his brother, James Hervey Shepherd, was summoned from Shepherdstown to assist.

22_Shepherd, was summoned from Shepherdstown to assist.
1817-1837 – RD travels to Europe, settles in Boston doting on his daughter’s education.

23_1822 – RD maintained his businesses
24_at 5 Pearl Street and nearby 28 Indian Wharf house.
1822 – RD maintained his businesses and shipping concerns at 5 Pearl Street and nearby 28 Indian Wharf house.

25_her portrait painted by Thomas Sully
26_Gilbert Stuart is commissioned to paint his own portrait
He has her portrait painted by Thomas Sully in 1831, a few years after Gilbert Stuart is commissioned to paint his own portrait. (Stuart died in 1828).

1829, April 20 – Ellen Shepherd marries Gorham Brooks of Medford, Massachusetts.

1834 – RD commissions Samuel Fuller to build the 480-ton merchant ship in Medford, named after his daughter, the “Ellen Brooks.”

27_James Hervey Shepherd dies
1837 – James Hervey Shepherd dies. RD returns to run businesses in New Orleans.

1837, July 23 – Ellen (Shepherd) Brooks and her husband, usually in Boston or Medford, temporarily reside in Baltimore.

28_nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr.
1837-1865 – RD’s nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr., who was brought up in his uncle’s counting room, gradually assumes the role as RD’s agent in New Orleans.

29_painting of the ship the “Ellen Brooks” is completed
1839 – RD’s commissioned painting of the ship the “Ellen Brooks” is completed, attributed to Samuel Walters (British, 1811-1882), called “Ellen Brooks, Off Holyhead, Homeward Bound.”

1841 – RD buys 468 acres of land and begins building Wild Goose Farm, but not yet living there full-time; he also pays for most of the remodeling of the original Trinity Episcopal Church in Shepherdstown.

1842, June – RD signs a petition to Congress along with numerous other planters and sugar manufacturers in the state of Louisiana that asks for an increase in the duties on imported sugar.

1849 – RD places responsibilities on his eighteen-year-old nephew, Henry Shepherd Jr., who would become his agent in New Orleans through the Civil War, allowing RD to return more permanently to his Wild Goose Farm.

30_Wild Goose Farm
31_the 1850 Census shows
32_1850 and 1860 Census slave schedules
1850 – In Shepherdstown & Wild Goose Farm; the 1850 Census shows 66-year-old RD with a period worth of 0,000, living only with workmen: 26-year-old German-born master stonemason Conrad Smith and an overseer. Although one account states Touro stipulated that RD free his enslaved persons, RD is shown to having owned numerous persons, enumerated in both the 1850 and 1860 Census slave schedules.

1854, January 6th – Touro’s Will makes Rezin Davis Shepherd residuary legatee of the estate and executor; 5,000 is willed to specific recipients. A sum iof ,000 is set aside for a palatial almshouse, with the added stipulation to RD that more sums, if needed, should be used to complete this priority project.

Judah Touro made out his will January 6, 1854 a few days before his death that said:

33_my dear, old, and devoted friend, Rezin Davis Shepherd
34_I hereby appoint and institute him
As regards my other designated executor, say my dear, old, and devoted friend, Rezin Davis Shepherd, to whom, under Divine Providence, I am greatly indebted for the preservation of my life when I was wounded on the 1st of January, 1815, I hereby appoint and institute him, the said Rezin Davis Shepherd, after payment of my particular legacies, and the debts of my succession, the universal legatee of the rest and residue of my estates, movable and immovable.

35_funded remodeling of the Trinity
RD continued his projects both in New Orleans and Shepherdstown. He had already funded remodeling of the Trinity

36_planned a clock and bell to its original church
Episcopal Church. He planned a clock and bell to its original church then after some legal squabbling – the clock – to everyone’s assent – was reassigned to be inserted in to the new government building.

The Shepherd Family is Scattered By War:

37_The war hit the family hard
The war hit the family hard. Most of the young men enlisted in Virginia units. RD had to recalibrate his business strategies. Wrote the Richmond Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861:
The New Orleans Delta states that R. D. Shepherd, Esq., who is now at an advanced time of life, living on his beautiful farm near Shepherdstown, Virginia, has directed his agent in New Orleans to pay over to the treasurer of the Confederate States a large sum of money, including, it is said, his whole annual income from rents in that city — the largest income enjoyed by any property holder — to be applied to the defence of the rights and the support of the independence of the South.

38_spring of 1862 when Federal General Banks
In the spring of 1862 when Federal General Banks with his army entered into Jefferson County, RD took refuge in Boston with his daughter.

39_As the war progressed
As the war progressed, its maw of destruction came closer to Shepherdstown’s nearly complete building. 130,000 troops moved in the area in September, 1862 for the bloody Maryland Campaign, just across the Potomac river. Wounded from the nearby battles poured into Shepherdstown, putting the unfinished Town Hall into service as an outdoor hospital.

Wrote Mary Bedinger Mitchell:

40_The unfinished Town Hall had stood in naked ugliness
The unfinished Town Hall had stood in naked ugliness for many a long day. Somebody threw a few rough boards across the beams, placed piles of straw over them, laid down single planks to walk upon, and lo, it was a hospital at once.

There were six churches and they were all full, the barn-like place known as the Drill Room, all the private houses after their capacity, the shops and empty buildings, the school-houses – every inch of space and yet the cry was for more room.

We went about our work with pale faces and trembling hands, yet trying to appear composed for the sake of our patients, who were much excited. We could hear the incessant explosions of artillery, the shrieking whistles of the shells, and the sharper, deadlier more thrilling roll of musketry; while every now and then the echo of some charging cheer would come, borne by the wind, and as the human voice would pierce that demoniacal clangor we would catch out breath and listen, and try not to sob, and turn back to the forlorn hospitals, to the suffering at our feet and before our eyes while imagination fainted at the thought of those other scenes hidden from us beyond the Potomac.

Had Federal General George McClellan crossed the Potomac and pursued General Lee’s scattered and mauled army, as historians have much criticized him since for not doing, Shepherdstown would have likely suffered greater damage, but, as it was, shells landed in the yards of the Lees and Morgans and one or two even hit Shepherd’s new Town Hall, but were of little consequence.

Property Losses in New Orleans:

41_RD’s fine residence at 18 Bourbon Street
42_18 Bourbon Street in New Orleans
More invasive, improvised use was being made of RD’s fine residence at 18 Bourbon Street in New Orleans, causing his nephew to formally appeal to the Federal powers-that-be in early 1864. He wrote:

43_From Brig. General James Bowen
January 29, 1864
From Brig. General James Bowen
Provost Marshal General
Department of the Gulf.

Sir:
The undersigned acting as the duly authorized agent and attorney in fact of Rezin Davis Shepherd, formerly the State of Virginia, but for more than eight months past residing with his daughter Mrs. Gorham Brooks in the city of Boston and State of Massachusetts, respectfully represents: That the said Shepherd is a loyal citizen of the United States and the true and lawful owner of the Brick Dwelling No. 18 Bourbon Street between Canal and Custom House Streets in the City of New Orleans and also of all the furniture and contents thereof: that in the month of June, 1862 Col. Stafford without show of authority, placed in possession of said house and contents, a man by the name of Horton or Houghton, who has ever since occupied and now occupied and uses the same as a Boarding House, and who never has paid any rent or compensation there and continually refused to do so.

Under the circumstances, the undersigned respectfully appeals to you, General, for relief, and asks that the matter be referred to Capt. Edward Page and Thomas Tileston, or other of them for investigation and that the aforesaid premises and contents be restored to the possession of the owner without delay; Henry Shepherd Jr.

Like The Town Hall, the huge, magnificent Almshouse in New Orleans remained unfinished, to be hit by a worse fate. Shepherd was charged by Touro’s will to first put ,00 toward its construction, then be prepared to put more money into its construction- including even some of Shepherd’s own funds – as recipient of Touro’s residue.

44_occupied by detachments of the 2nd Maine Cavalry
45_The fire started
46_Baked beans fired the building
On September 1, 1865, at a time the Almshouse in New Orleans – still with an unfinished, floorless top floor – was occupied by detachments of the 2nd Maine Cavalry and Company K, First Louisiana Cavalry. A baking oven was in heavy use at one end of the building so that heat would be carried through a fissure in a ventilation system close by. The fire started in the rafters above the third floor. It was night-time with a high wind and no flooring yet laid for the third floor in that wing. Coals dripping from the fire then ignited tar on the lower walls. “Baked beans fired the building” said one from the 2nd Maine Cavalry. The building was uninsured. Just a few months later R. D. Shepherd died of typhoid fever, November 10, 1865, no longer the executor of the estate, leaving no philanthropist to help make up the loss.

Wrote the editors of the Times-Picayune in a long obituary:
In his native village he erected a splendid building, designed for a town hall, also a large academy, with beautiful grounds and a walk. He also deposited with the Mayor annually a large sum to buy fuel and provisions for the poor. He also erected the largest and most costly church in Jefferson County. Many other acts of public and private benevolence were performed by him in his quiet, furtive manner.

With war ended and when he was still healthy, RD had urged that his Town Hall become the County Court since the Charlestown courthouse was a battle-scarred ruin, especially from a shelling it took in the fall of 1863.

A Visitor Contemplates Charlestown’s Ruined Courthouse in mid-1865:

47_the court-house, where that mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin
48_Four massive white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof
A short walk up into the centre of the town took us to the scene of John Brown’s trial. It was a consolation to see that the jail had been laid in ashes, and that the court-house, where that mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin abandoned to rats and toads. Four massive white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof, through which God’s blue sky and gracious sunshine smiled. The main portion of the building had been literally torn to pieces. In the floor-less hall of justice rank weeds were growing.

49_Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the walls
Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the walls. No torch had been applied to the wood-work, but the work of destruction had been performed by the hands of hilarious soldier-boys ripping up floors and pulling down laths and joists to the tune of “John Brown,” the swelling melody of the song, and the accompaniment of crashing partitions, reminding the citizens, who thought to have destroyed the old hero, that his soul was marching on. It was also a consolation to know that the court-house and jail would probably never be rebuilt, the county-seat having been removed from Charlestown to Shepherdstown — “forever,” say the resolute loyal citizens of Jefferson County, who rose to vote it back again.

50_either buried in Elmwood Cemetery or the Shepherd Burial Ground
The Shepherd boys who enlisted in Virginia companies each – over time – came home and were either buried in Elmwood Cemetery or the Shepherd Burial Ground – or lived.

51_Clarence Edward Shepherd
Clarence Edward Shepherd became a teacher in Maryland.

While RD’s nephew and agent, Henry Shepherd Jr. was in New Orleans during the war, minding the family interests, three of his brothers were at war. The eldest Rezin Davis, his older brother who had a young family

52_eldest Rezin Davis, his older brother who had a young family
since 1858, died of disease November 2, 1862 at his “river cottage” after imprisonment in the Old Capitol Prison for being an associate of Confederate spy, Redmond Burke. He left his widow, Elizabeth Boteler Stockton Shepherd, two children (Fannie and Alexandria) and a third (David) on the way. Probably first buried on his farm, Rezin Shepherd (a nephew of the patriarch) was reburied after peace came in the new Elmwood Cemetery. His site was joined by all his family as time unspooled.

53_twenty-five year-old Abraham
Henry Jr.’s next brother, twenty-five year-old Abraham, enlisted May 22nd, 1861, would move over to Co. F. of the 17th Virginia Cavalry, get wounded at the third battle of Winchester in September 19, 1864, and become a prisoner of war. But he survived the war and died many years later in 1907.

54_Henry Jr.’s younger brother, James Touro (Truro) Shepherd
Henry Jr.’s younger brother, James Touro (Truro) Shepherd, enlisted as a Private May 1st, 1861 in the 2nd Virginia Infantry. Like many, the rigors of marching under Gen. Stonewall Jackson proved an impetus to transfer out into a Cavalry regiment, and he joined Co. B of Gen. Stuart’s Horse Artillery under John Pelham, with a promotion to first lieutenant. His service record ends abruptly in the spring of 1862. The Shepherdstown Register in September, 1865 reported him having died in “Richmond City” in March, 1862. His marker dates his death as August 13, 1862, which may be the date of his re-internment into the family burial ground.

Two sons of James H. and his wife, Florence Hamtramck Shepherd were buried a few feet apart in the family burial ground on Shepherdstown’s New Street adjacent to the Episcopal rectory. Robert F. Shepherd, who joined Co. H, 2nd Va. Infantry, died May 4, 1862 of pneumonia.

55_Robert F. Shepherd, who joined Co. H, 2nd Va. Infantry
56_Alexander H. Shepherd
Alexander H. Shepherd, who enlisted when he was about twenty-eight April 4, 1861 in Co. H of the 2nd Virginia Infantry; he died of typhoid fever at Camp Harman near Fairfax Courthouse September 25-26, 1861.

57_Rezin Davis Shepherd was buried there too
Rezin Davis Shepherd was buried there too, in his own time.

He left all his fortune to his daughter, who, since 1855, had been a widow.

Wrote the Shepherdstown Register: A Large Estate – the late Rezin D. Shepherd left an estate valued at about ,500,000 all of which goes to his daughter, Mrs. Brooks of Boston. He was born in 1784 (on the lot where the court house would be built). In 1809 he went to New Orleans and engaged in the commission business until 1849 and was the executor of the estate of the late Judah Touro. Mr. Shepherd was formerly a merchant in this city, residing on High Street. He accumulated a very large property in New Orleans and was reputed to be one of the wealthiest men of that city. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, he returned to Boston and resided for a short time with his daughter and sole heir, Mrs. Gorham Brooks, widow of a son of the late Peter C. Brooks. His estate on High Street was formerly, we believe the property of Samuel Dexter.

The Massachusetts Historical Society today displays a cannon donated by the family and acquired by RD – a smaller version of the one that so severely wounded RD’s friend, Judah Touro.

The visiting journalist Trowbridge was proven wrong – the county seat DID go back to the Charlestown Courthouse. Wrote the editors of the Charlestown-based newspaper, The Spirit of Jefferson, in 1894:

58_The Normal College building, formerly the town hall
The Normal College building, formerly the town hall, on Main Street, is a handsome structure, the gift of one of the Shepherd family, Rezin D. from which the town takes its name. You will remember that it was used as a court house since the war and the courts of Jefferson county were held there, one Judge Hall sitting on the bench. A political rape was perpetuated on Charlestown, the party in power, fitly termed radicals, thought they had a sure thing of it, built a jail and added a wing to either side of the town hall, but “the best laid schemes of mice and men gang af’t aglee.” The fellows that did all this mischief were turned down by the people and things took their normal shape and Charlestown was again the county seat.

Shepherd University began when the county seat of Jefferson County, West Virginia, was moved from Shepherdstown to Charles Town in July 1871. On February 27, 1872, the Legislature of West Virginia passed the following act: “That a branch of the State Normal School be and the same is hereby established at the building known as Shepherd College, in Shepherdstown, in the county of Jefferson.”

59_RD’s descendant, Shepherd Brooks
RD’s descendant, Shepherd Brooks, made it final when he deeded the property and building over to the School and a three-person board of trustees to maintain it.

As they say, settings reverse, the tide of life had gone out – and – came back in again.

Cool Machining Supplier photos

Verify out these machining supplier images:

blast off!

Image by uteart
showing some fire right here… in the Large view: www.flickr.com/pictures/uteart/4143924855/sizes/o/
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For 9 days, each and every day one more trade or profession will pay for shooting off the hundreds of rockets. the first ones at 6am – then 12 noon – then7pm…. and the Rocket-Castle at 11pm at night.

Yesterday was the Bricklayer’s turn, constantly the loudest day of them all!! I went to the yard behind the church from exactly where they will be launching the rockets. This aparently is not for the public, it is a harmful undertaking and the gates were closed behind the coheteros. And i was locked in with them, nobody has told me to leave… they let me take images!!!

All of a sudden i noticed 5 guys were lighting up cigarettes, then the &quotsupplier’ brought bundles of rockets and the coheteros began lighting them with their cigarettes, holding them among two fingers until they had catched fire prior to letting go. This is a hazardous and essential moment, simply because virtually instantly following ignition, a enormous fire beam would shoot from the rocket to the ground and the rocket was launched… handheld!!! A total of 1300 rockets have been shot up into the air, in a 30-minute time frame, accompanied by a concert of ringing church bells.

Most rockets had been launched, as you see here, bare handed!! Other individuals had been launched all lined up and stuck in some wooden- or metal frame help. Thus, by igniting the 1st a single, some 50+ rockets would explode simultaneously… like machine-gunfire, Wow, what an experience!!!! – I took a handful of hundred shots (in brackets), just to catch that beam of fire, but neither the fire-beam, nor the explosions of the rockets up in the blue sky showed up significantly on my images taken in broad daylight, just a lot of smoke. I will appear for a night shot in my archives, where the beam of fire is quite visible and impressive.

My desk at Operate

Image by metamoof
Here’s a image of my desk at work, labelled with a variety of bits and bobs. As requested by syn on www.livejournal.com/users/synthclarion/363683.html . My phonecam is rather crap, no?

Helmet

Image by clarksworth
Custom-made helmet for a short film.

The helmet is primarily based on the old brass Mk two diving gear, but with a modern/alien twist. The design of the piece is inspired by peak sci-fi films such as Alien, Star Wars and Blade Runner – function before form.

The helmet was produced from two stock acryillic hemispheres, with a sheet styrene construction on the back. Detailing was with a variety of model kit components, sillicone glue and basic electronics, along with stock plastic fittings from specific effects suppliers EMA Model Supplies. The &quotgun&quot was made overnight from what ever leftover stock I had to hand, which consists of PVC pipe and a number of other prop components (the tip is the nosecone from Derek Medding’s Thunderbird 1). The faceplate with the several lenses was inspired by the Bolex cameras we utilised to use at uni. Concept to final building was about six days, with some overnight periods. The building technique wasn’t my preferred one – with a lot more funds, CNC machining and fibreglass casting would have created the process a lot less complicated, but that would have quadroupled the expense of the costume.

The helmet’s design was a important component of the cinematography of the piece – it is not only extremely reflective and complete of surface detail, but it also has two forward LED spotlamps that illumunate the scenery around it. My part in this film – largely as production designer and camera op – was to guarantee that the art path actually was an integral component of the film, and not just an afterthought.